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Thread: Want to work on the "Beale Papers" (after a long absence due to hospitalization) :P

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    Default Want to work on the "Beale Papers" (after a long absence due to hospitalization) :P

    Hey everybody (Especially GenticBlend):

    This is a two-fold conversation, but since it starts off-topic, I decided to put it here and let it get shirted elsewhere if it needs to be

    Just dragged out of the hospital after a bad med reaction sent me there for 42 days. No computer, not enough ability to concentrate even if I had a decent book to read, and nothing in the way of vistors -- though I did have people who loved and called me while I was half delirious. To give you an idea, I didn't even know where I was, (Brookline, MA) and thought the only people who could find me was the Chinese food delivery guy who catered to people that had money and didn't like hospital food. Needless to say, I tried everything to get him to "tell my friends I am here" until someone handed me a phone.

    My last three days there, I really missed working out my brain and the puzzles we do here, (Please, no more circle-the-words!) and in particular was wondering if anybody had done work or was actively still working on "The Beale Papers". (I have notes on the cryptography aspect going back for many months now, but know little about the historical facts.)

    In particular, since this is an irksome subject to many (including myself) when people run around saying "I know something you don't", I would like to through out a few things I consider hard core the I have found.

    The entire Library of Congress pamplet (which can be downloaded from bitmap version from Project Guttenburg, I think) seems to be the puzzle, not just the more famous number section. In particular, I divided the pamplet into part "A" (The narrator telling the story), part "B" (the alledged supporting letters), and part "C" (the actual three ciphers). Part "B" may be the most interesting in the short term for investigation, for when I looked through for several types of code (there were about 5 easy ones, I think), I discovered the use of Morse. This carbon-dates either Morse codes differently from its actual invention to first date of public use, or pushes back to the 1850's the date when the letters themselves were alledgedly created. To find the Morse, basically, you check out the punctuation of the part "B" letters, for example a period is a "dit" (dot) and a comma is a "dah" (dash), and you break up the paragraphs to form sentences. (For example, one goes along the lines of "I leave my kod n testate . . . ") I'll bring out my papers for more infor, but right now I'm working on a timed computer with less than 10 minutes left. On a longer letter in part "B", there are 5 dashes between every real letter.

    And, yes, Morse exists in Ciphers 1,2, and 3 that I have found -- but that is another story that read like a wild spaghetti western telling of a gold mine located in Arizona
    Is it still there? Maybe, maybe not for being mined out due to other factors -- but the words do seem to string together. As for the New Englad cache, sorry guys -- the info seems to lead that 30 men went 1, 1 betrayed the others and snuck off with some codes, leading "Beale" to tell his followers essentially to raid the Virginia stash, and head out to protect the Arizona gold mine.

    Suggested reading for backup-info a travel book authored by Gwinn Harriss Heap, that can be ordered for $20 online, but is rare enough to cost $2500 for a real copy.

    Will be adding more later, but now I am down to 3 minutes

    Thoughts?
    FANDANGO! (Maybe...)

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    Not quite sure how to elegantly add more to a post I was making that was interrupted by a library time-limit, but here goes:

    The second part of what I call part "C" (the numbers codes) was alledgedly solved by a simple book substitution Cipher, using a misspelled, and slightly misworded "Declaration of Independence" that was included in the "Beale Papers" pamplet. For instance, if you had the number 23, you would find the 23rd word, and take the first letter, and when done, the message starting "I have deposited . . . " would emerge, about a cache where gold, silver (would the silver have corroded?) and jewelry (which struck me as odd, even though he alledgedly got the jewelry for future trading to throw people off the scent of the gold, Cortez melted down all the booty he took for better transport, and if Beale and his men didn't make the jewelry themselves, would the jewelrs have eventually talked?) was alledgedly buried.

    However, taking the SAME cipher (2) you can do something a little more interesting -- as you can with Cipher 1 and 3. Take the Declaration as given in the Beale Papers, mispeelings and all (Which is why I think the entire Papers themselves is a puzzle, not just the number Ciphers) and do a LETTER count, making sure to highlight letters that are capitalized, and letters that are followed by punctuation. When Ciphers 1, 2, and 3 in part "C" are written correctly (the end numbers of each line as shown in the pamphlet being where you end each line you work with on an individual basis), you can then go a step further with simple anagrams. Here's the trick -- Captial letters start each potential word or stand alone, Letters followed by punutaction end each potential word. Spaces and punctuation, from what I have worked on so far, do not count towards holding a counted place in the letter count variation. To mae sure you have what you need when you are done, you well have a complete, personal letter that reads in short sentences, 1-line long, no broken words between lines. So, here is some, but (not completed) raw data:

    LL THREE CHERRY ROSE
    THIRD THIRD OCCUR, IN, D
    NORTH NOTES AT VA INN
    TO FIND LAST AREA RUN
    REVEAL MY CHID F IN D
    UPON THE NORTH E CAVERN
    LETTER TWO FITS IIO D DOT
    HULE PT BUTTE, NE NE NE
    AT THE FORT QUINCE H,
    THIS IS HR LAST BIN IN HI
    (I TROY R)(I TROY R) R HERE

    Even then, some people would wonder (rightly) if they have gotten the right thing. So, go one step further to verify -- take the fist and last letters of each word and anagram to get a short phrase from the same, for example:

    LL THREE CHERRY ROSE becomes "Tell Cyre" . . . (the name "Cyre" appears several times, and speaking of time, I am running low one my second computer term :P )

    THEN FOR A REAL MIND BENDER, do it all over again, this time using the LETTER count of the U.S. Constitution, starting with Article One, original spelling, right down to the signatures. (Thank God for free postings of this on-line.)

    Down to three minutes again :P

    Bytes and Peaces check out.

    Will try to post more, but hope this helps. -- And I haven't even gotten to how the Morse is twisted in it!

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