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Thread: Musical References

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mekigal View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by FoxyKeys View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Genetic Blend View Post
    I already mentioned some section titles. But here are a few more.

    "Once When I Was Mustering" is a song by Slim Dusty.
    "Greenhorn" is a song by the Black Crowes.
    "Bandit" is a song by Neil Young.
    Hey, Genetic.... you are rockin' girl. There is a music connection. There are also a ton of Railroad songs. Could our cowboy be an outlaw?

    Beth
    In a way I would say. More of an underground person, or counted as an out law but didn't do the crime.
    Hi Mekigal!

    Major good observation. I hadn't thought about the Underground Railroad. Harriet Beecher Stowe, Levi Coffi, a number of others are connected to finding a way for slaves to find refuge.

    Interestingly, many runaway slaves had to rely on the North Star for direction to safety. Songs were coded for them (allegedly). 'Follow the Drinking Gourd' referenced the star formation, the Big Dipper. A fellow Twelever mentioned the bubble placement in Cowboy to resemble the constellation.

    Another song was 'Go Down Moses' in which Moses was believed to be a metaphor for to the Conductor of the Underground Railroad. 'Now Let Me Fly' had to do with Ezekiel's Wheels which was seen as the direction of North, equating it to freedom. 'Swing Low, Sweet Chariot' and 'Steal Away to Jesus' were also associated songs for the Underground Railroad.

    Happy Troving.
    Beth

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    Adding this from p.15 ("Lonely"). "...thinking symbols and of Buck Owens with a song he once watched him play and sing on his father's old 28 inch Phillips televison..." Which Buck Owens song?

    I don't know if this will help, but many old cowboy songs feature "lonely" and "roaming" and "night stars" (or something similar) in the lyrics. Just for one example, "Tumbling Tumbleweeds" (written by Bob Nolan for the Sons Of the Pioneers, and also later covered by many others). And then there's "Cowboy Jack" (a 19th century ballad sung by the Carter Family in the 1920's). "Lonely cowboy" is in the first line in "Cowboy Jack", and repeats over and over.

  3. #23
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    Default Another code (but not a musical one)

    I know this is a bit off topic for this thread, but it was brought up that there were songs with codes that were used for the slaves who used the underground railroad...hobos who traveled along the real railroads also used a "hobo code". This was (and I think still is) a simple code that consists of just some symbols that mean certain things. Some examples would be a symbol for a house where a barking dog lives, or a symbol for where a doctor lives, or where they can get some free food, etc...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Genetic Blend View Post
    I know this is a bit off topic for this thread, but it was brought up that there were songs with codes that were used for the slaves who used the underground railroad...hobos who traveled along the real railroads also used a "hobo code". This was (and I think still is) a simple code that consists of just some symbols that mean certain things. Some examples would be a symbol for a house where a barking dog lives, or a symbol for where a doctor lives, or where they can get some free food, etc...
    Hi Genetic Blend!

    I think it was great to post your hobo info. Thanks! I also found out that slaves, seeking freedom, sewed quilts which contained codes. In the book, 'Hidden in Plain View' (which reminds me of the poem on p.30), quilt blocks were used to describe how to get ready for escape, what to do on the trip, and where to go.

    The cowboy drawing opposite GREENHORN page, looks to me like a patchwork quilt. Maybe it's like a quilt pattern called 'The Drunkards Path'. The pattern is made in such a way to tell escaping slaves to stagger their path to freedom as a way to avoid those hunting for them.

    The page opposite the little note picture you found interesting, looks to me like a pattern that describes the need to bring tools... Maybe a knife, hammer or shovel would help a slave keep safe or ensure their path to safety. Perhaps it's a message for us treasure hunters to remember to bring our tools when we reach our location.

    The T shape looks like the one on p.9 (Go West). Unsure if that is related at all. Hope this helps, even though it's not musical.

    Ridin' the Rails,
    Beth

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    Goofy on a Horse here.

    I was thinking about Hobos and Freight train songs. An old tune, written by a black American woman named Elizabeth Cotton named 'Freight Train' was written around the turn of the last century. Interestingly, these songs carry with it a romance of travel, hard times, loneliness... many excellent country songwriters, pickers and singers come to mind.

    Merle Haggard - 'Freedom Train' and 'Hobo Bill's Last Ride'
    Hank Williams - 'I Heard That Lonesome Whistle Blow'
    Bruce "Utah" Phillips - 'Old 901', 'Daddy What's a Train', 'Nickel Plate Road 759', Wabash Cannonball, and more

    Somehow, I think the location of Domino's stash is connected to train songs and the horsemen and women who sang them. You can ride a horse, or ride on (or in) an iron horse as well... motorcycles, trains, and even old trucks.

    Lookin' for a trail,
    Beth

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    My favorite hobo train song of all time is by Jimmie Rodgers--"Waiting For a Train"

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    Quote Originally Posted by spiggan View Post
    My favorite hobo train song of all time is by Jimmie Rodgers--"Waiting For a Train"
    I like the Greg Brown's The Train Carrying Jimmy Rogers Home.

    Great thread, the music references are building steam! Nice work GB.
    ========================

  8. #28
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    Totally out of character of a cowboy song, we have ABBA featured on page 24 with "Chiquitita" and "$$$" which is "Money, Money Money". Short a letter, this group reminds me of a sizzling breakfast. OOhh - I am making myself hungry!

    s

  9. #29
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    This thread is on one of the right "tracks.'


  10. #30
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    Jimmie Rodgers was one of the "Singing Cowboys". He sang with a distinctive yodel. Some other singers tried to imitate him. One singer in particular could not quite imitate the yodel, and it came out sounding more like a HOWL. That singer became known as the "Howlin' Wolf".

    One of Jimmie Rodgers' more famous songs was "T is for Texas".

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