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Thread: weird coincidence about 3243

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    Default weird coincidence about 3243

    I was going to post this under p.6 in BOS but I thought it might get lost since so few are looking at Dar right now. I was just playing around with 3243 and found this oddity and wanted to get it off my chest. Am I just doing some circular math here, or what?

    First, the defiinition of "period", the ambigram on p.6, from dictionary.com is "a round of time marked by the recurrence of some phenomenon or accomplished by some recurring process or action...or, the point of completion of a round of time..."

    Since the long/lat strings are base 5 that we have to convert to base 10, it makes since to use the 448 base 10 number for 3243, so I started playing around with 448 and solar and lunar cycles.

    A solar cycle/period is 365.25 days. (This also works if you use 365.) A lunar cycle/period is 28 days.

    448 years = 163,632 days = 5,844 lunar cycles.

    Divide all the above by 16 (or 4 intervals of 4).

    In 448 years, there are exactly *28* solar cycles and exactly *365.25* lunar cycles.

    Coincindence? Am I just doing circular math?

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    I was in a hurry when I wrote the end of that--here's what I meant to say:

    448 years (365.25 days per year) = 163,632 days
    = 5,844 lunar cycles (28 days per lunar cycle.

    Since the number 4 seems to be so important overall, I was curious to see how far I could divide each the above by 4. I divided them by 4 four times (that is by 16) and got
    in that 1/16th interval--

    28 solar periods...same as the number of days in a lunar period

    365.25 lunar periods...same as the number of days in a solar period

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    Spiggan;

    Very interesting. You had me thinking for a while. I love puzzles like this. I think you are right in that the math is somewhat circular. I often do things like this to myself. I see patterns all the time where there are none - other than what comes about when you feed part of an equation back into itself.

    There are two things that make this work:

    The first is that there is indeed some circular math going on with the number of days in a year that you use both in the multiplication and the division - although it's kind of subtle. We can prove that the number of days in a year is irrelevent and not related to any of the other numbers in our little equation by simply replacing 365.25 with another arbitrary number and then checking to see if it still works. So let's pretend there are, say, 150.5 days in a year. Let's see if it still works...

    a) 448 years * 150.5 (days in my new shorter year) = 67424 days.
    b) 67424/28 = 2408 lunar cycles (remember our year is shorter now).
    c) 448/16 (your magic number) = 28 (same as before)
    d) 2408 (lunar cycles in our shorter year) /16= 150.5

    Same results, different numbers. This means we can cancel out the 365.25 in our "equation" and remove it all together. We can do this by pretending there is one day in a year...

    a) 448 * 1 day a year = 448 days.
    b) 448 / 28=16 lunar cycles (our year is now shorter than our month)
    C) 448 / 16 = 28 (same as before)
    d) 16 (lunar cycles) / 16 (our magic number) = 1 (days in our year)

    By making our year one day long we can remove the irrelevant parts of the equation. We are left with just...
    b) 448 / 28 = 16
    C) 448 / 16 = 28

    This makes the second circular issue rather obvious...

    What it comes down to is that you've simply discovered in a round about way that 448 /28 = 16. This is what makes this work.

    You can seemingly relate any numbers together like this. For example, let's change physics around and say that there are 56 days in a lunar cycle, but still 365.25 days in a year. Since the numbers are different, we need to find a new "Magic" number - ie 448/56=8.

    So, as you got the magic number of 16 for your 28 day cycle, I will use 8 for my 56 day cycle...

    So...

    a) 448 * 365.25 (days in a solar cycle) = 163632 days...

    b) 163632/56 days in (my) lunar cycle = 2922 (of my) lunar cycles

    c) 2922/8 (my magic number) = 365.25

    d) 448/8 (my magic number) = 56 (days in my lunar cycle).


    Same results - different numbers.
    Hope this helps.

    kibitz









    Quote Originally Posted by spiggan View Post
    I was in a hurry when I wrote the end of that--here's what I meant to say:

    448 years (365.25 days per year) = 163,632 days
    = 5,844 lunar cycles (28 days per lunar cycle.

    Since the number 4 seems to be so important overall, I was curious to see how far I could divide each the above by 4. I divided them by 4 four times (that is by 16) and got
    in that 1/16th interval--

    28 solar periods...same as the number of days in a lunar period

    365.25 lunar periods...same as the number of days in a solar period

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    Here's one of my favorites to keep you on your toes...

    Three guys are in town for a convention and they decide to share a room. The cost is 30 dollars so they pay the man at the front desk 10 dollars each and then head up to the room to unpack. Meanwhile the guy at the desk remembers that he forgot to give the guys the convention rate of 25 dollars instead of 30 so he gives a kid 5 bucks to run up to the room.

    But on the way up the kid decides that you can't divide 5 by three so he keeps two dollars for himself and gives each of the guys a dollar back.

    So now, drum roll.. each guy paid only 9 dollars for the room instead of 10. 3*9 is twenty seven dollars, plus the two the kid put in his pocket - that's 29 dollars. Where did the other dollar go?

    kibitz.

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    I know the answer!

    Spoiler alert!
    It's all in how you say it.
    Take the $27 and SUBTRACT the 2 dollars.
    That equals $25 that is in the register...

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    That's really good...I was racking my brain, and I couldn't figure that out for the life of me.

    Thanks for clearing that up. I had a feeling it was circular but I couldn't put my finger on why. I am still wondering this though--do you think it still could mean something that this number of 448 solar cycles (not considering the accompanying 163362 days and 58444 lunar cycles) can be divided by 16 to begin with?

    Judging from the book, the Grand Syzygy of three eclipses in the year 448 (3243) would be the first to ever happen. But (following the "Hest" math I was doing above) every 28 years in Hest time the Sun, Moon, and Earth would happen to close their cycles within the same year, but with no Grand Syzygy, maybe just one or two harmless eclipses, as Yorah mentions in the book, not the Grand Syzygy. (I guess that is something like a Saros period for eclipses.) Apparently at the time the story takes place, it is the end of the last of these sixteen 28-year intervals. Does this make sense? It's interesting to me to see it in that time perspective.

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    kibitz,

    I was stumped by your riddle at first, but then I saw that, like a magician, you had cleverly directed our attention to something other than what is relevant.
    If you recognize my avatar or know about shard V or "RUN...STEAL", please pm or e-mail me re possible partnering.

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    Yes that was a clever riddle! It reminds me of a knot that you loop over and through and under and over and when you pull it the knot disappears. I have been doing a lot of that with these books.

    How about this big leap of the imagination...what if the "the year of ye Hest 3243" is a way to say that the the Hest year = 3243 days? (448 base 10)

    448 is divisible by 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64, so a 448-day Hest solar cycle would fit really well on the points of a compass, right? There are the 16 points on the compass roses in the BOS and on some of the suns. There are the 16 circles around the big circle on p.80, and 16 circles around the circle on the cover of the book (half of them are behind Ana). There would be 16 lunar cycles in a year, one for each of the main points around the compass. 64 weeks in the year.

    Just off the top of my head, this looks like it could fit on three decoder rings, though I haven't the slightest idea how it would work exactly. The largest would be the solar ring, of course, with the compass points around it. A smaller ring inside it would be for the lunar cycle. The the smallest inner ring would be the 24-hour clock that Doc is talking about, with the 12 rotating teardrop code symbols marking the times of day. Maybe the inner clock dial would set the outer two dials, or something like that.

    Anyway, I like that the fact that number 448 has a lot of compass applications, together with the fact that the Hest code seems to be all about compass directions.

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