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Thread: C Masquerade Hint

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    Genetic Blend's Avatar
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    Default C Masquerade Hint

    It is obvious that this book is molded after "Masquerade". The author also gives us a number puzzle similar to what was in Masquerade. The puzzle tells us to "C Masquerade Hint", or this could possibly be interpreted to "C Hint Masquerade".

    I haven't seen this mentioned anywhere, but perhaps the author could literally mean, "See Masquerade Hint". Kit Williams came out with a hint that was published in the Sunday Times. This hint was a line drawing of himself, holding a scroll, and surrounded by animals. To solve the hint, the scroll had to be folded and viewed in a mirror. And what resulted was a cryptic message that was meant to tell those doing the puzzles, that they had to look at the tallest fingers and the fattest toes. We know that this was one of the most important parts of solving Masquerade. A line drawn from the eyes of the person to the tallest finger, would result in pointing to a letter in the border. And a line drawn from the fattest toe from the person's eyes to the border would reveal a letter.

    What I am wondering is this: Is our clue in Fandango to C Masquerade Hint referring to this particular HINT that was released to the newspaper?

    It seems obvious that Fandango "follows his nose"...But I have tried this Masquerade-like method, and have gotten nothing.

    Has anyone had any luck with this method?

    Or do you think "C Masquerade Hint" means something else?

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    thedawailey is offline Twelever Silver thedawailey is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by Genetic Blend View Post
    It is obvious that this book is molded after "Masquerade". The author also gives us a number puzzle similar to what was in Masquerade. The puzzle tells us to "C Masquerade Hint", or this could possibly be interpreted to "C Hint Masquerade".

    I haven't seen this mentioned anywhere, but perhaps the author could literally mean, "See Masquerade Hint". Kit Williams came out with a hint that was published in the Sunday Times. This hint was a line drawing of himself, holding a scroll, and surrounded by animals. To solve the hint, the scroll had to be folded and viewed in a mirror. And what resulted was a cryptic message that was meant to tell those doing the puzzles, that they had to look at the tallest fingers and the fattest toes. We know that this was one of the most important parts of solving Masquerade. A line drawn from the eyes of the person to the tallest finger, would result in pointing to a letter in the border. And a line drawn from the fattest toe from the person's eyes to the border would reveal a letter.

    What I am wondering is this: Is our clue in Fandango to C Masquerade Hint referring to this particular HINT that was released to the newspaper?

    It seems obvious that Fandango "follows his nose"...But I have tried this Masquerade-like method, and have gotten nothing.

    Has anyone had any luck with this method?

    Or do you think "C Masquerade Hint" means something else?

    GB,
    I wondered if we are supposed to read the letters after Masquerade as "Hint". It does not follow the number pattern seen in C Masquerade. For it to spell Hint, we have to take it out of numerical order: 16, 10, 18; if it's kept in numerical order, it spells iN H T, and then there are the remaining two seemingly meaningless letters P and L.


    I also considered a connection to that hint (which apparently was not helpful to anyone who read it at the time) and I've tried looking at a variety of things in the mirror as well as folding pages (my book is a mess!), but didn't come up with anything.


    Although there is definitely a nod to Masquerade, and most of us either have the book or have researched it to death online, Pel said in his interview that everything we need is in the book, so it seems unlikely that we would have to track down and decipher a 30-year old hint in order to solve Fandango! If this is the case, what else could C Masquerade Hint mean?


    The dictionary defines masquerade as "to disguise oneself, to assume the appearance of something one is not." Maybe this book is disguised as something it is not. The story and the setting are detractors to the treasure hunt itself.

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    mattylarocha is offline Junior Twelever Bronze mattylarocha is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Quote Originally Posted by Genetic Blend View Post

    It seems obvious that Fandango "follows his nose"...But I have tried this Masquerade-like method, and have gotten nothing.

    Has anyone had any luck with this method?
    Using the eye to nose method on p. 5, I have gotten the word ROSE.

    We all know how well Pel likes his rose...http://www.bhcivic.org/about/structure.html
    Last edited by mattylarocha; 07-05-2014 at 09:48 AM. Reason: error

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    matty,

    If that were indeed the method we are supposed to be using, I would think that we would get more messages on other pages as well. I will take a look at page 5, particularly. The word "rose" could certainly be important, as in a compass rose.

    theda,

    I wondered too, why the word "HiNT" wasn't spelled correctly. If the author can manage to spell "Masquerade" letter-for-letter, then why not the word "Hint"? I think perhaps it must be some kind of clue (or hint!) to guide us to something, but what?

    As for "C Masquerade Hint", I still think the author might be telling us that there is something in Fandango that is done similarly to Masquerade. But as the author said in an interview, you will not need Masquerade to be able to solve Fandango, but perhaps he is just giving us a little push in the right direction.

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    Puma Lion is offline Junior Twelever +1 Silver Puma Lion is on a distinguished road
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    Throwing this out for general consideration and input: What if "C Masquerade HiNT" means the instructional phrase that was at the beginning of the Masquerade book? Kit Williams directed his readers: “To solve the hidden riddle, you must use your eyes, and find the hare in every picture that may point you to the prize.” It turned out that the eyes and pointing were important, but the reference to the hare seems like misdirection - the rabbit images per se were not integral to find the hidden message and solving the riddle.

    In Fandango, we have a lengthy message at the beginning of the book - sort of a plot summary. It includes this line: "Fandango sets off on a hair-raising adventure . . . " I know many of us have tried to spot oddly-worded phrases to see if they have hidden meanings or purposes. This one is not particularly odd, but it might deserve consideration IF the "Masquerade HiNT" is the line about finding the "hare" in every picture. The Fandango book tells us that clues are both visual and verbal. Verbal is not the same thing as written: it means spoken out loud. To me, that suggests that puns might hold the answer to finding a hidden message and/or a riddle.

    Could the "hair" in every picture, and/or hair references in the text, somehow be the salient feature that will direct us to a message? There are some other hints in that direction. On p. 51, a border phrase says, "A Tail to Tell." Normally, one would expect to have a "tale" to tell at the end of a hair-raising adventure, but the authors used the word "tail" here. In the next illustration (p. 55) we see that Fandango's tail looks like a key. On p. 49, Fandango discovers the key is missing, saying, "My poor, wet pelt! / The key, which I'd kept nestled in my fur / was gone!" I think I posted a theory earlier about the fox and the key becoming one, and this led me to ponder whether Fandango represented the key and/or whether the FO-shaped skeleton keys, in combination with the letter X hidden in the illustrations, might point to a solution. This notion may be too closely linked to that old line of thinking, but the new variation is that we would be somehow looking at Fandango's pelt or hair (or maybe other characters' hair) for direction. The proud old Fop says, "Everyone gets skinned!" which seems to make no sense at all, in any context, except if there is a motif around hair and pelts and tails and skins (the Fop himself appears to be bald).

    Here's a list of hair-related things from the story. Maybe someone can see something fresh in them that hasn't occurred to me:

    p. 7 - the key is in Neptune's beard.
    p. 8 - the girl has clouds for hair.
    p. 11 - hair visible only on Virgo (in silhouette) and Vitruvian man. Also on cloud figures near apple and big dipper.
    p. 13 - tucked it in my fur
    p. 14 - eels in his wet beard
    p. 15 - illustration showing eels
    p. 16 - "Keep your head!" "Everyone gets skinned."
    p. 17 - Fop is bald.
    p. 20 - "The eagle tailed me..." "I thought, again, / of running off to hide..."
    p. 23 - no visible hair
    p. 25 - whiskers
    p. 26 - Celestia casts fairy dust onto Fandango's hair? W on fox's forehead?
    p. 27 - These little goons / Had got into my hair . . .
    p. 29 - touched my brow
    p. 30 - Harley Quinn's odd mustache and beard. His jacket lining made of an animal skin?
    p. 32 - Abnaki has four braids in his grey hair
    p. 33 - authentic buckskins
    p. 33 - tamed, bristled, wild - hair-related terms
    p. 34 - red in border phrase refers to color of fox's hair.
    p. 38 - Eel-Beard's orders (Note: two lines on this page contain the word "blast." I'm just now wondering whether the lobsterman's t-shirt -think red/yellow - is telling us something about "blast line . . . ".)
    p. 40 - Does the wool sweater count as a visual "hair" clue, because it is made of wool? Old Lady's hair is grey.
    p. 44-45 - Fox's tail not visible; Panhandle Sam's hair (if any) not visible. Yak a veiled reference to hair?
    p. 46 - bright tail; "I saw someone was watching me / From among the clouds" (See p. 8 - the girl has clouds for hair)
    p. 49 - My poor, wet pelt! / The key, which I'd kept nestled in my fur . . .
    p. 51 - Figure in the clouds appears to be bald. Are the clouds her/his hair? "A Tail to Tell."
    p. 53 - "...that's when he heard sobs rise up and out / Of his own beard - the Lady's face was hidden in his damp curls."
    p. 55 - fox's tail shaped like key.
    p. 56 - four winds in corners with cloud hair

    If the master riddle is revealed through hair, the references to "stay right on my tail," and Neptune's beard, the Wind's hair as clouds, and even a pun on "hide" would all fall into place.

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    TheYellowWatchdog is offline Junior Twelever Bronze TheYellowWatchdog is an unknown quantity at this point
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    A bit off topic but can someone show me a page of Masquerade with the eyes/longest digits lines drawn in? I can't figure out how to make it work. Thanks!

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    Molnar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheYellowWatchdog View Post
    A bit off topic but can someone show me a page of Masquerade with the eyes/longest digits lines drawn in? I can't figure out how to make it work. Thanks!
    I'm not sure that pages like that exist. It's been a long time since I've thought about this particular hunt, but I'll try to guide you through the first one.

    The key is to draw the lines from eyes through the longest digits to the center of the border letters (for eyes/digits that are visible). You must also go in the correct order: left eye to left finger, left eye to left toe, right eye to right finger, and right eye to right toe; order is humans (men, women, children) then hare, then other animals that do not have a black ring on the Isaac Newton page.

    On the first page there is the hidden hare and three mice. Starting with the hare, left eye to left fore paw goes to the C in COLD and left eye to left hind paw goes to the A in EARTH (rhs). Right eye to right fore paw goes to the T in EARTH (lhs) and right eye to right hind paw goes to the H in THE. The hardest part here is finding the hare's paws.

    Next down the page is the flying mouse: left eye to left fore paw is E in EIGHT, left eye to left hind paw is R in EARTH (rhs). Mouse in nest: left eye to left fore paw is I in SIX and right eye to right fore paw is N in ONE. Mouse on bottom: right eye to right fore paw is E in EIGHT and right eye to right hind paw is S in SIX.
    WHRECVBBLSMCEYVIHTEOIZROMR

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    TheYellowWatchdog is offline Junior Twelever Bronze TheYellowWatchdog is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Default Masquerade image with eye/digits lines?


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    That looks about right.
    WHRECVBBLSMCEYVIHTEOIZROMR

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    stunnuts is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper stunnuts is an unknown quantity at this point
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    I wonder if the word "hint" isn't actually the word "thin". Remember that there are two Masquerade books: the original large hard bound book and the smaller, thin, solution booklet. Perhaps there is something in the explanation book that helps solve the puzzle as the last page states "A Treasure Found, A Treasure Lost, The Two Together, Forever Held". What I do not like about this contest is the lack of information about what we are seeking and the lack of confirmers. For a $10,000 puzzle this is proving tougher to crack than Treasure, The Search for the Golden Horse.

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