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Thread: The key cannot be buried in the national park: can it still be hidden there?

  1. #11
    Ashmunk23 is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper Ashmunk23 is on a distinguished road
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    I had mentioned earlier that I was thinking that the key could be in a location only at an appointed time- like The third Wednesday in August meet at the top of Cadillac Mountain and say the Grass is Green to the guy in the purple hat, but Harley mentioned this response she got from Pel, "Thank –you for your inquiry. Unfortunately what you have described is not correct. There is a key hidden in a specific spot. Solving the riddle will reveal that location." I'm not sure what she asked, but this makes me think that the key is there all the time...in that case... where can it be/have been for all these years? Are churches, libraries, graveyards public property? And hidden? If not buried, what other options are there? I was thinking maybe in one of those little magnetic boxes that you can stick to a metal fence or something? Hmm...any thoughts on potential methods of concealment?

  2. #12
    thedawailey is offline Twelever Silver thedawailey is on a distinguished road
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    I recently contacted Acadia National Park regarding the specifics of hiding anything on park land. Today I received this response:

    "Thank you for your interest in Acadia National Park. In response to your question, it does not matter if the treasure is buried or not, it is still not allowed in Acadia. Acadia NP would never give permission to something like this as it would cause a lot of people to comb the park digging, going off trails and using metal detectors (which are prohibited in the park as well). If permission was given to one group, it would be hard to deny others and we get a lot of requests for this type of activity, all of which are refused.

    Leaving behind a key - or anything - to be found matches the description of abandoned property, which is prohibited on Federal lands. More to the point, the park does not want a lot of social trails forming from people scouring an area in search of a hidden key. If you know of anyone who is organizing a treasure hunt like this, please ask that they remove any ‘treasure’ to be relocated if it is currently hidden within the park."

    This makes it clear that the key cannot be in the park legally. As far as where it might be, maybe a public park? A ball field? I had considered a cemetery at one point. Tucked into a stone wall along a roadway seems a bit risky. The Cobblestone Bridge -seen in the Indian illustration, is the only one of the Bridges of Acadia that is outside the park, however, I think this part of the carriage road system is on private property. There are other parts of the carriage roads that weave in and out of the park, so I guess those public ways would be fair game.

  3. #13
    Ashmunk23 is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper Ashmunk23 is on a distinguished road
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    Thank you for this Thedawailey! It sure sounds like they are disavowing any knowledge of a Key hidden there...which is great news, because then it probably isn't there!!! That's a lot of square miles that are out of the running- along with private property...time to get creative as to where it could be!

  4. #14
    thedawailey is offline Twelever Silver thedawailey is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashmunk23 View Post
    Thank you for this Thedawailey! It sure sounds like they are disavowing any knowledge of a Key hidden there...which is great news, because then it probably isn't there!!! That's a lot of square miles that are out of the running- along with private property...time to get creative as to where it could be!
    I think the book is designed to mislead us - everything about it points to Acadia. Maybe what we should be looking for is anything they mention that is NOT in the park.

  5. #15
    Harley98 is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper Harley98 is an unknown quantity at this point
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    But didn't Jeff just use the word "acadia" (twice in the book I think? the license plate and at the beginning if I remember correctly)
    "Acadia. An old jewel on a chain". We are assuming Acadia National Park because of images. Because the illustrations show locations in Acadia NATIONAL PARK. But the book only says Acadia. right?
    Where did that name come from? Is there more that was once know as "acadia?" Isn't that an old Abenaki term? Trying to remember but did I read it was once "Arcadia" that was slowly changed to Acadia way before there was the park? What did that name refer to?

  6. #16
    Harley98 is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper Harley98 is an unknown quantity at this point
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    from wikipedia-

    Acadia (French: Acadie) was a colony of New France in northeastern North America that included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and modern-day Maine to the Kennebec River.[1] During much of the 17th and early 18th centuries, Norridgewock on the Kennebec River and Castine at the end of the Penobscot River were the southernmost settlements of Acadia.[2][3][4] The actual specification by the French government for the territory refers to lands bordering the Atlantic coast, roughly between the 40th and 46th parallels. Later, the territory was divided into the British colonies that became Canadian provinces and American states. The population of Acadia included members of the Wabanaki Confederacy and descendants of emigrants from France (i.e., Acadians). The two communities intermarried, which resulted in a portion of the population of Acadia being of mixed-heritage.

    The first capital of Acadia, established in 1605, was Port-Royal. A British force from Virginia attacked and burned down the town in 1613, but it was later rebuilt nearby, where it remained the longest serving capital of French Acadia until the British Siege of Port Royal in 1710.[a] Over seventy-four years there were six colonial wars, in which English and later British interests tried to capture Acadia starting with King William's War in 1689. During these wars, along with some French troops from Quebec, some Acadians, the Wabanaki Confederacy, and French priests continuously raided New England settlements along the border in Maine. While Acadia was officially conquered in 1710 during Queen Anne's War, present-day New Brunswick and much of Maine remained contested territory. Present-day Prince Edward Island (Île Saint-Jean) and Cape Breton (Île Royale) as agreed under Article XIII of the Treaty of Utrecht remained under French control.[6] By militarily defeating the Wabanaki Confederacy and the French priests, present-day Maine fell during Father Rale's War. During King George's War, France and New France made significant attempts to regain mainland Nova Scotia. After Father Le Loutre's War, present-day New Brunswick fell to the British. Finally, during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War), both Île Royale and Île Saint-Jean fell to the British in 1758.

    Today, the term Acadia is used to refer to regions of North America that are historically associated with the lands, descendants, or culture of the former French region. It particularly refers to regions of The Maritimes with French roots, language, and culture, primarily in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, the Magdalen Islands and Prince Edward Island, as well as in Maine.[7] It can also be used to refer to the Acadian diaspora in southern Louisiana, a region also referred to as Acadiana. In the abstract, Acadia refers to the existence of a French culture in any of these regions.

    People living in Acadia, and sometimes former residents and their descendants, are called Acadians, also later known as Cajuns, the English (mis)pronunciation of 'Cadiens, after resettlement in Louisiana.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by thedawailey View Post
    I think the book is designed to mislead us - everything about it points to Acadia. Maybe what we should be looking for is anything they mention that is NOT in the park.
    I strongly believe the blatant info in the images misleads, but the hidden / coded / interpreted info is what is needed. Fandango says he "runs your hide all around" or something effect.

    The "acadia" license plate is a possible example of blatant. The last digit is crossed out or split, the first could be 13, etc , so the obvious and easy "Acadia" looks like a misdirect or hides the actual helpful interpretation.

    (recent mention of the "Acadia" code)

    http://mysteriouswritings.com/mw-cod...-number-codes/
    Free is the best deal!

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  8. #18
    thedawailey is offline Twelever Silver thedawailey is on a distinguished road
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    Harley - thanks for the info! Here's a little more history:

    From the Wikipedia entry for Acadia National Park:
    “Initially created as the Sieur de Monts National Monument in 1916, the park was renamed Lafayette National Park in 1919. It was renamed again in 1929 as Acadia National Park in honor of the former French colony of Acadia, which once included Maine.”

    The current Maine ‘Acadians’ live along the Maine/ New Brunswick border in Aroostook County. I used to live up there and they have an annual Acadian Festival, held in Madawaska.This is from the Acadian Festival website:

    “The State of Maine's Largest Cultural Festival. Events include a re-enactment of the first Acadian Landing in Northern Maine, traditional Acadian supper, entertainment, cultural displays, a festival Parade, Party du Main Street and many more. The Festival is held each year in conjunction with a large family reunion, honoring one of the Acadian pioneer families.”


    Although this will not help us find the key, it's fun to learn of the people and the history of an area!

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