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Thread: Blacklight

  1. #1
    osian is offline Needs to say Hello! osian is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Default Blacklight

    I'm not sure if anyone else has thought of this, but I tried looking at the book under a blacklight. I was particually interested in the the cover of Ye Nomenclature of Faeries on page 37. However, I did not see anything new. I also tried it on the rest of the pages in the book but it didn't seem to reveal anything. Just thought I would let the forum know that someone had tried it. Let me know if you have a page that you would like me to look at again with the blacklight.

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    cpblake is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper cpblake is an unknown quantity at this point
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    I was joking with my husband last night about there being clues written in invisible ink like in the National Treasure movie!

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    You'd be surprised how many people have done *experiments* on their books, but are probably too embarrassed to share the results! LOL

    In the David Blaine hunt, someone stuck their book in the freezer, to see if anything hidden showed up... At least one other person held his book pages over the stove (can't remember if it was electric or gas) to try and find hidden messages. I think others tried different chemicals... None of these had any *good* results!

    Kids, do NOT try this at home!!!
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    juji23 is offline Needs to say Hello! juji23 is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Default A different light?

    Thanks to all - I've greatly enjoyed reading these boards and love the concept of this hunt. I'm actually not participating in the pursuit of any of the treasures but have enjoyed the exchange of ideas here.

    I thought I'd offer this because I haven't seen it mentioned yet. Has anyone viewed the illustrations under alternate lighting i.e. blacklight? Sometimes this emphasizes different things in an illustration. A silly idea perhaps, but it can't hurt to try.

    Good luck!

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    juji23 is offline Needs to say Hello! juji23 is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Default Dang...

    Just after posting I noticed the other thread on this. I swear I just looked them all over! Sorry about that.

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    That's ok... but we might delete this so it's not always here.

    Maybe we ought to start a thread in "Tools" about the things we're using to search.

    I have a mirror, magnifying glass, and a flashlight I'm using! LOL
    "It's not what you look at that matters. It's what you see." (Henry David Thoreau)

  7. #7
    cpl_crud is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper cpl_crud is an unknown quantity at this point
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    G'day.
    I'd just like to point out that I don't have a copy of the book, nor am I eligible (I'm an aussie).
    However, in my experience, here are a few ways to see "hidden" inks.
    (Just a quick note before I start, in the Newspaper interview, MS mentions that "Self-publishing the book had advantages"- invisible ink could well be one of them).
    There are multiple ways of viewing Blacklikght (UV inks).
    - Straight Blacklight. This is used when an invisible, but quickly checked ID is required. You can buy pens that write in this ink, and it's used on money and home appliances. You view it by holding a blacklight to it (However, this has already been ruled out).
    - Blacklight + filter. Some inks will only be visible if you use a blacklight and a filter. A common example of this is air conditioning fluid. You need a blacklight and pair of yellow tinted glasses. It's used to detect leaks, or in places where there might be other UV-sensitive dyes (like, in your engine). There are also UV/Red and UV/Green inks.

    Heat-Sensitive inks
    These are like the "Nation Treasure" inks you were discussing. The simplest of these is writing on paper with lemon juice, then (carefully) putting the paper in the toaster. The lemon juice oxidises, and turns brown.
    Whilst lemon juice isn't likley to be the reagent used here, there may be other heat-sensitive inks used. To test for HS inks, I suggest running the pages over the roller in a fax machine. It's a nice, even heat suorce that isn't going to burn your book. Alternativley, use a hair dryer, however they tend to get hot after blow-drying 100+ pages
    HS inks generally turn up black/brown on a white background, and do not require filtering.

    Cold-Sensitive inks
    Now, I'll have to say that I haven't ever had contact with there, however there's no chemical reason that they shouldn't exist. Putting your book in the freezer (in a bag of course) might be an idea.

    Humiditiy/moisture sensitive inks
    I doubt that these would be used, simply because they're unstable, and there's no garuntee that the ink wouldn't develop in transit. However, if you're bored, you could always try putting your book in a plastic bag and bleeding some steam into it from a kettle. It could also stuff up some of the glue, which could be a problem for the book's longevity

    Reagent-activated inks
    These work like camera film- information is placed onto the paper, however it requires a chemical to "bring it out". Now, there are a huge, huge number of chemical combinations that could do this, however, if oyu want to persue this course of action, I suggest you get a copy of the Solubility Rules (from any chemistry textbook), and get a small section of the printed page tested for the chemicals present (this, of course, will mean the destruction of a page. It's a bit drastic, I know, so I wouldn't advise it, unless there's something in the text/images that strongly hint towards an invisible message).

    And there you have "Cam's Quick Guide to Invisible Inks".
    I'd be happy to answer more questions on this subeject, however I get the feeling it's red herring territory. Fun stuff to know tho.

  8. #8
    dillera is offline Junior Twelever Copper dillera is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cpl_crud
    Heat-Sensitive inks
    These are like the "Nation Treasure" inks you were discussing. The simplest of these is writing on paper with lemon juice, then (carefully) putting the paper in the toaster. The lemon juice oxidises, and turns brown.
    Whilst lemon juice isn't likley to be the reagent used here, there may be other heat-sensitive inks used. To test for HS inks, I suggest running the pages over the roller in a fax machine. It's a nice, even heat suorce that isn't going to burn your book. Alternativley, use a hair dryer, however they tend to get hot after blow-drying 100+ pages
    HS inks generally turn up black/brown on a white background, and do not require filtering.
    The interesting thing about heat sensitive inks would be the obvious connection to Poe's Gold Bug.

  9. #9
    cpl_crud is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper cpl_crud is an unknown quantity at this point
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    in my mind I'm seeng thousands of people scurrying for the nearest fax machine...

    if you could give me more info on the Gold Bug thing, I might be able to give a more "detailed" idea of how to make the ink show... if there's any there.

    Like I said, I don't have the book, just looking to help out where possible

  10. #10
    cpl_crud is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper cpl_crud is an unknown quantity at this point
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    ack!
    After reading a couple of other posts (which are porbably going to be deleted) I heard of someone using a flashlight to view the pages, which reminds me of watermarking! And me remembering watermarking made me remember polarisation! Sorry- it's 4am here and I'm slowly losing it

    Watermarking-
    You've probably seen example of this on cheques, or some "high class" foolscap papers.
    Basically, to see this, hold the paper up against a light (ie, put the page bewteen you and the light).
    This won't work on magiscene-type glossy paper, however it
    should work on your normal, average book paper. Only thing is, watermarking is done when the paper is manufactured, so that would mean that the watermarked paper would have to be aligned exactly with the print, and that each page would have to be cut exactly, and printed seperatley... a lot of effort. But, then again, so is setting up this whole exercise...

    Polarisation
    It's possible to polarise ink, although is is costly.
    To see the invisible message, you would need a sheet of polarised material, which you would then have to place on each page and rotate 90 degrees.
    You could do this by buying a pair of polarised sunglasses, however you would have to tilt your head every page, AND have one eye closed (generally, sunglasses have one lens polarised one way, and the other the other way- helps with the glare).

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