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Thread: hyphen at the end of a page

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    sa6race is offline Junior Twelever Bronze sa6race is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Default hyphen at the end of a page

    I noticed that the words at the end of pages 73 and 88 are hyphenated. This seems odd. Why didn't they just put the whole word on the page before or after? Anybody in the publishing/editorial world know if this is unusual?

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    moscow32's Avatar
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    The hyphens through out the text bother me. The text is not justified, so it wouldn't seem to need hyphens. I just did a random sample of books on my shelf (mind you, none of them are "picture books") and they all have justified text with hyphens.

    One of my MBA classmates and I have been arguing about justification of our papers. She can't stand the uneven spacing that full justification leaves between words. I can't stand the jagged edges that comes with no justification. That's why I noticed the hyphens. The lines are jagged.

    Each hyphen might be telling us something. Who knows.

    There goes my first post!

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    svh01973 is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper svh01973 is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Default hyphens

    I noticed the hyphens last night. On page 14 "Caterpillar" should be hyphenated if anything is. Look how much space there is on the line above it. I thought it was perhaps because it is the first word of the sentence, but I can't find any rule that says not to hyphenate the first word of a sentence in any grammar book I have.

    I don't expect anything to come of it, I just wanted to let you know that I noticed it too!

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    Somewhere in all these threads somebody mentions a cipher where you count letters that come after punctuation marks. They gave an example where you could count every third letter after punctuation. I think the hyphens are a big clue to try that cipher. The more punctuation you see, the more likely there is information hiding. If I find anything I'll let you know!

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    sa6race is offline Junior Twelever Bronze sa6race is an unknown quantity at this point
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    I agree that the odd punctuation marks are a sign to "look here." (I know the cipher you are talking about, but I can't remember which thread it is in.) The trick will be finding an instruction to go with a particular punctuation mark. It could be anything. Three letters after, three letters before, ten letters after, the first word of the line, the first word of the sentence etc. I refuse to believe that MS just wants us to try everything until we happen upon the right formula by accident. Then the solution would be found by dumb luck and not by actually solving a puzzle. Therefore, I am assuming that one of the pictures contains a direction about how to find the words hidden in the text. I have been looking for instructions in the pictures that say something like "three letters after hyphen" or something like that. Of course, this instruction must be hidden in some way in the picture, maybe represented by pictures instead of letters. I thought about the saws in the tools picture, because a hyphen "cuts" a word in half. But I can't really see anything in the tools picture. I also thought about the "dash" of salt in the cracker picture. There are five grains of salt on top of the salt container. Maybe this means five letters/five words after or before a dash?? It would be a real stretch because the clue (if it is a clue) is so vague. Or maybe the picture that mentions Pook's gas problem is a reference to the colons in the text?? (Just kidding about the last one.) Anyway, I would welcome any thoughts about how to use the marks in the text to reveal hidden words. I really think that if the text holds the key, then the punctuation marks would be the best way for the author to point us there. Or maybe someone else can come up with some other unique set of markers that we see in the text?

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    debz's Avatar
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    The only token I found was SQUAT!!!
    http://www.tweleve.org/upload/squat_token.jpg

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    sa6race is offline Junior Twelever Bronze sa6race is an unknown quantity at this point
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    That's it. Thanks.

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    dee
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    what about the page that has the dashes in the leaves at the bottom? i dont have my book, but i know the sequence was III II II.

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    Dee, I have found 3-2-2 on several pages. Don't know what it means. Sorry.

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    max10_50 is offline Getting the hang of it. Copper max10_50 is an unknown quantity at this point
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    Default hyphenated contractions

    I find the hyphens particularly odd when they are used in a contraction. For instance, the first line of page 91 ends with was-
    n't. And there is not a logical reason because the text on that page extends further out than that word would have had it not been hyphenated.

    There are also the lines that connect two words or phrases together that are too long to be called hyphens. I don't know what to call them. The last full paragraph on page 91 is a grammatical catastrophe. I am working on finding some meaning to the madness.

    Nan-
    cy

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