+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Beal's Conjecture $100,000

  1. #1
    rickyarrow is offline Good Twelever Aquamarine rickyarrow is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    817

    Default Beal's Conjecture $100,000

    BEAL'S CONJECTURE: If Ax +By = Cz , where A, B, C, x, y and z are positive integers and x, y and z are all greater than 2, then A, B and C must have a common prime factor.

    $100.000 Reward for a solution: http://www.math.unt.edu/~mauldin/beal.html

    This is the "proof" I will be submitting to Doctor Mauldin and was seeking to put it into on a journal. This was posted on July 8,2008 on Tweleve.


  2. #2
    rickyarrow is offline Good Twelever Aquamarine rickyarrow is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    817

    Default

    Why do I think this is right?

    All the numbers are "postive" in the proof- 123456

    XYZ are greater than 2 which it is in the proof -456

    ABC must have a common Prime which is 3, which is in the proof -333


    Best

    Danny Ocean

  3. #3
    rickyarrow is offline Good Twelever Aquamarine rickyarrow is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    817

    Default

    This CBeal guy is Andrew Beal who came up with this conjecture. He is a Billionaire and holds the world record for the largest poker game in the history of the world..........


    Brillant doe not even describe him...........

  4. #4
    rickyarrow is offline Good Twelever Aquamarine rickyarrow is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    817

    Default

    This Andrew Beal is off the charts in IQ and talk about a "Midas Touch".


    Andrew "Andy" Beal (born 1952) is a Dallas, Texas-based businessman. He made his fortune in banking and real estate, and is the founder and chairman of Beal Bank and Beal Aerospace Technologies. Beal is also known for his high-stakes poker and mathematics activities.


    Early life

    Beal wanted to be a businessman since he was a teenager in Lansing, Michigan. During his years in high school, he would earn money by fixing televisions and installing apartment alarms, and with his friends he began to relocate dislodged houses. Beal linked hydraulic jacks, and his friends would raise the homes at night, then move them.[citation needed]
    Beal, who had excelled on his high school debate team, enrolled at Michigan State University and subsequently attended Baylor University in Texas. At age 19, Beal bought a house for $6,500 (USD) and started renting it for $119 per month, which eventually led to his first net gain as a businessman.

    Business career

    In 1981, Beal bought a project building in New Jersey, the Brick Towers. Beal became known for buying properties that no one else would want; he figured out that everything he bought could be turned into a profitable property.
    His business strategy paid off, and in 1988, he was able to open his first bank in Dallas. At first called Allegiance Savings and Loan Association, the tiny building was the first bank of the company that would later be renamed to Beal Financial, which now includes Beal Bank, Beal Bank Nevada, CSG Investments, Inc, Loan Acquisition Corporation, and Beal Mortgage Services.
    During the 1990s, Beal tried to expand Beal Bank's services to include international markets such as Russia and Mexico. These attempts failed, however, and Beal retreated from foreign expansion.
    In 2000, Beal Bank bought over $1 billion USD in commercial loans from the SBA. These included loans made to businesses in Palau, and the United States Virgin Islands, where some local businesses had borrowed money from American institutions after Hurricane Hugo.
    After the September 11, 2001 attacks, Beal once again went against what some call "common business sense", and began buying aircraft debt. He figured the airlines would recover from the tragedy; aircraft debt prices were very low at the time following the attacks, and Beal bought them expecting to sell them once they rebounded in price. Beal Bank makes about $70,000,000 USD of profit a year from those bonds.


    A blackjack player in his youth, in 2001 Beal began visiting the Bellagio in Las Vegas to participate in high stakes poker games, especially heads-up Texas hold 'em. During several visits between 2001 and 2004, Beal played a syndicate of professional poker players known as "The Corporation", which included Doyle "Texas Dolly" Brunson, Todd "Darkhorse" Brunson, Ted Forrest, Jennifer Harman, Howard "The Professor" Lederer, Phil Ivey, Gus Hansen, Barry Greenstein, Chau Giang, and others.
    Beal hoped to force the collective group of pros into such high stakes that their play would be influenced by the amount of money at risk. By the end of their encounters in 2004 they were playing $100,000/$200,000 Limit Texas Hold 'Em heads up with more than $20 million on the table. This story was chronicled in Michael Craig's book, The Professor, the Banker, and the Suicide King: Inside the Richest Poker Game of All Time.
    While the games outlined in Craig's book ended in 2004, Beal returned to Las Vegas from February 1-5, 2006 to again take on "The Corporation" in a $50,000/100,000 Limit Hold 'Em match at the Wynn Las Vegas Casino. Opponents included Todd Brunson, Jennifer Harman, Ted Forrest, and others.
    On February 5, 2006, Beal was down $3.3 million (USD). He then returned to the Wynn a week later, and won approximately $13.6 million from the Corporation during daily poker sessions from February 12-15.[1] The games resumed February 21-23, with Phil Ivey representing the Corporation against Beal at limits of $30,000/60,000 and $50,000/100,000. During these three days, Beal lost $16.6 million to Ivey.[2]
    Beal is recognized as the poker player who won more money in a poker game in a single day than any other known poker player. On Thursday, May 13, 2004, at the Las Vegas Bellagio, Beal won $11.7 million from Chip Reese, Hamid Dastmalchi, Gus Hansen, and Jennifer Harman.[3]

    Mathematical work

    Beal's work in mathematical number theory includes his 1993 articulation of Beal's conjecture, and he has offered a $100,000 (USD) prize for its proof or disproof.[4]


    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Beal"

  5. #5
    rickyarrow is offline Good Twelever Aquamarine rickyarrow is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    817

    Default

    THE BEAL CONJECTURE

    How smart is Andrew Beal? Smart enough to astonish some of the smartest people on earth.
    By Melinda Rice
    As a banker and businessman, Andrew Beal uses his number-crunching abilities to make money. As a mathematician, he puts his number-crunching abilities to another use.
    “Oh no. No. No. I’m not a mathematician,” says the entrepreneur, and the modesty is sincere. “I’m just a hobbyist. I dabble in number theory.”
    Two years ago, Beal stunned the rarefied realm of academic mathematicians by coming up with something none of them had thought of—a numerical puzzle that has since been dubbed the Beal Conjecture.
    He worked on the problem himself, then threw it out for the world to ponder, offering a prize to whoever can come up with a proof. Beal recently added 25,000 additional incentives to the original $50,000 award.
    The American Mathematical Society, which administers the award, receives about 20 calls each month about the proof. A few of the callers are cranks; many are students—some as young as junior high school age—and the rest are a mixed bag of academics, reporters, and the merely curious.
    “This helps stimulate interest and research in this field. It’s at the very cutting edge of mathematical development,” says R. Daniel Mauldin, the University of North Texas professor who chairs the AMS prize committee. He’s referring to the Beal Conjecture, not the prize money.
    But the cash incentive is unusual, too. Glory, not greenbacks, is often the only reward for unraveling mathematical mysteries.
    One famous exception is Fermat’s Last Theorem, a problem posed by French mathematician Pierre de Fermat in the mid-1600s. Fermat was reading a chapter by the ancient Greek mathematician Diophantus on a particular problem in Pythagorean number theory (these problems tend to hang around for a while) when he scribbled next to the text, “I have discovered a truly remarkable proof which this margin is too small to contain.” He died before he could share his proof with anyone, leaving historians and mathematicians baffled for the next 300 years. German physician Paul Wolfskehl, who died in 1906, was so intrigued by the question that he bequeathed 100,000 marks to whoever solved it, setting a deadline of September 12, 2007.
    Princeton University Professor Andrew Wiles claimed the prize in 1993, but a gap in his reasoning was discovered, so he went back to the drawing board. Two years later, the professor offered a conclusive proof that the equation xn + yn = zn has no non-zero integer solutions for x, y, and z when n is greater than 2. Wiles’ proof, however, is very complicated, and that has left mathematicians wondering whether Fermat’s own proof—the one he didn’t write down—wasn’t much simpler. Speculating on the same mystery led Beal to a generalization of the Fermat theorem. Beal believes that the solution to his equation could provide a simpler solution to the Fermat equation. Over the last three centuries, attempts to grapple with the Fermat problem have led to important discoveries in algebra and number analysis. Mauldin says a solution to the Beal Conjecture could have further applications in cryptology. Already, the challenge has forced mathematicians to think in new ways about number theory. More important, though, in Maudlin’s mind, is the mathematical interest the challenge is sparking in young people.

    Source http://www.bealaerospace.com/article...ture02008.html

  6. #6
    rickyarrow is offline Good Twelever Aquamarine rickyarrow is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    817

    Default

    I don't see a Billionaire screwing anyone out of $100,000. Unlike Jason King John Mappin Mike Stadther Duncan Burden.

    I rather spend a whole year learning the math employing PHDS then deal with smucks..........who never intended to pay out in the first place.

    So this conjecture is my new journey into puzzle land but at least I will get paid.

    Nothing like cheating cheaters..........


    Best

    Danny Ocean

  7. #7
    rickyarrow is offline Good Twelever Aquamarine rickyarrow is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    817

    Default

    Nothing like cheating cheaters..........the most deeply and moving religious experience a man could ever have.

  8. #8
    rickyarrow is offline Good Twelever Aquamarine rickyarrow is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    817

    Default

    Contated several PHDs in math on this proof............will post the results of this epic journey.



    Best

    Danny Ocean

  9. #9
    rickyarrow is offline Good Twelever Aquamarine rickyarrow is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    817

    Default

    The 'math world" really does not care for outsiders. Mr Beal himself was attacked and scoured by the "Math World" In the end thou he found a few math friends who helped him to get the credit for such a BRILLANT discovery. I have had the same problem.............not with scourn but getting help.

    The really good news is I was able to get ahold of a rep for Mr Beal who will in person pass along this "proof" directly to Mr Beal From here I hope to cheat the cheaters...

    This is what I sent to Mr Beal:


+ Reply to Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts