+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Fortnight

  1. #11
    benzleasr's Avatar
    benzleasr is offline Good Twelever TwelevePlus
    Aquamarine
    benzleasr is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    895

    Default Fort Night Lair

    Moo, very interesting site. I think Helen Keller, Alchemist, Artists, Music,
    Newton, and many, many other things tie together inside this man's mind.
    Perhaps it is the people who have made the biggest impressions on him that he is going after with each creature. We're not looking for one puzzle, we're searching for 12 and that is probably where we are getting tied up. They are constantly crossing each other in text, clues, etc.

    I read somewhere that he also collects art by Arthur Rockham. If you look at Rockham's paintings, you can see where MS is inspired. Even his name inside the banner is similar. Someday, we will see the whole references and go, "whack!" Until then keep researching.

  2. #12
    benzleasr's Avatar
    benzleasr is offline Good Twelever TwelevePlus
    Aquamarine
    benzleasr is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    895

    Default Philosopher's Stone

    One more note concerning stone. Much info concerning the philosopher's stone that ties strongly to this story. Worth reading. Check out this site concerning the Philosopher's Stone.

    http://www.world-mysteries.com/awr_alchemy.htm

  3. #13
    dehlen's Avatar
    dehlen is offline Junior Twelever +1 TwelevePlus
    Bronze
    dehlen is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    153

    Default

    I really found this part interesting....

    Inside the fort it is night where the mysteries coil in their lair, their hiding or sleeping place. Everything in the world can be described in terms of its purpose or use; there is a continuum of objects on which we depend. From this we posit, hopefully, other continuums, which might lead from lead to gold, from life to everlasting life.
    Also in the Helen Keller section the following:


    The references are to beyond and beyond and beyond, or, as Helen Keller wrote, "There is always more." A Cypress Tree (in the Courtyard), 2000, begins inside a diagram of the human inner ear, with the diagram obscured and the word "EAR" blared and smudged in black tar and white wax, both hardened after burning.
    Now, check out the thread on pg. 63 and turkeymonkey's use of the phrase EAR.

    Got me going - but I'm not sure where!
    Just when you think you see the light at the end of the tunnel, someone orders more tunnel.

  4. #14
    benzleasr's Avatar
    benzleasr is offline Good Twelever TwelevePlus
    Aquamarine
    benzleasr is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    895

    Default Ear

    Also, look at this post from Ladyfeline...


    Posted: Sat May 14, 2005 8:25 am Post subject:

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I thought I found the coolest of clues last night. I was working on the text on page 40 and before going to bed, I looked at the picture on page 41 for the thousandth time. Lots of things going on on this page, but let's see-we have a button that needs to be sewn, flour and salt to make something with, rays of sunshine on the tin and on the sock and what is supposed to be, spilled tea. DO RE MI FA SO LA TI DO. So I took the pointing fairies advice and started with the button, then went in a clockwise motion ending with the tea and got 5 notes. SO (sew) RE (rays on sock) DO (flour) RE (sunrays on tin) and TI for tea. Then I turned these into their respective notes. Not into stone; into notes.
    DO=C
    RE=D
    MI=E
    FA=F
    SO=G
    LA=A
    TI=B

    This gives me GDCDB. Turn these into numbers. 74342
    Zip code maybe?? This gives me a place called Eucha, OK.

    Now, I don't think there is a token here. And if it hadn't been for finding something else within clue #2, I would not have found this significant at all. What I had found in clue #2 was "inner ear" and "lee iacocca". Don't ask me how, it was so long ago. So I Googled "inner ear" and took a look see.

    http://www.vestibular.org/gallery.html

    Interesting, the "lee iacocca" turned out to be the "cochlea" which looks to me like a snail.

    Back to Eucha, OK. Being in the medical field for 20 years, I knew this "eucha" looked familiar. If I add the word "station" to it, (I'll try to explain that in a minute), I get "eustachian", which as you can see is also in the inner ear. It's a tube, (a duct, if you will), a passage from the tympanic (drum, music) membrane into the pharynx. As the picture indicates, the whole inner ear is a labyrinth. As is this book.

  5. #15
    quakrspecl's Avatar
    quakrspecl is offline Twelever Silver quakrspecl is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Down SR77 from Lyndale Q
    Posts
    311

    Default

    benzleasr -

    I'm re-posting some thoughts I placed on the other site. Seems similar to what's being discussed here. Make of it what you will, or give it the heave ho!

    (Also, thanks to LadyFeline: Been looking for some more clues to firm a theory. The "ears" have it!)

    Anyway, here goes.
    Originally Posted: Fri May 13, 2005 8:44 pm as a response to Mister Whisker's posing the question: Which weighs more? An ounce of feathers, or an ounce of gold?

    ===============================================
    "Eureka!" shouted Archimedes.
    Or was that, " You reek-a!", in reference to a stinky doth? (or human!)


    Mister Whiskers-

    I've been following a similar path the past couple months, and was wondering, if you've been thinking along the same line(s)?

    Your memory is sound concerning Troy Ounces; 12 to the pound

    Speaking of "ounces": May the abbreviation for ounce -> "oz" be seen as an image on pages 16 and 63?

    Mister Whiskers, your post and sophistk8's response about page 68 of ATT: http://www.12gems.com/phpBB2/viewtop...?t=521&start=0
    led me to do some research on the "Wizard of Oz", or "Wizard of Ounces".
    Here're just a couple sites of many that'll give you an idea of what I'm seeing:
    http://www.halexandria.org/dward313.htm
    http://www.prosperityuk.com/prosperi...es/wizzoz.html

    The Wizard of Oz, written by L. Frank Baum, is not a mere child's story.
    Much like ATT.
    And here's a str-r-r-e-etch. Checking out page 45 of ATT, we find the following passage describing the tree, Yorah:
    "She sometimes spoke a little too frankly, but always truthfully..."

    "Baum"=Tree (in the German language)

    L. Frank Baum



    Speaking of pounds, an apothecary pound equals a troy pound.

    It may be that Helen leads us to Troy (though not Troyes)?

    Food for thought:
    The unknown weight of the Hummingbird may lead us to consider a "dubious" baker, who throws in a 13th item to cover his tail and avoid the long arm of the law.
    To paraphrase an online source: In bygone years, the English enacted strict penalties for those who gave short weight.
    During this era bakers were usually not educated and not so adept at "scaling" their wares. So to avoid any penalties, the bakers would give 13 instead of 12 or a dozen, just in case they miscalculated. A Baker's Dozen.
    Pook the 13th.

    Now, we know the Hummingbird is not a bug, but a bird that hums (or its wings do so, anyway).
    So - not leaving the Hummingbird entirely, but back to Oz for a moment:
    Within the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, we find Chapter 16 is entitled "The Magic Art of The Great Humbug".
    The Wizard, a.k.a, Oz is the Humbug.

    Many alluded idioms within ATT. One may be the following excerpt from page 85:
    "If only he had paid more attention then perhaps he could find her—but he hadn't—and now, she paid for his hard headedness."
    Not certain, but might this also mean:
    "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"

    Or, if Zac had only paid attention in an attempt to hear Ana's thoughts: "A penny for your thoughts".

    Probably better idiom(s), so I'll keep looking.


    Without trying too hard, anyone can find references to "weight" and "mass" throughout the text of ATT.

    Just a few references:
    Page 26: "..., as if to emphasize the gravity of the situation."

    Page 34: "...and the heavy Caterpillar carried by..."

    Page 89: "Zac shouted, desperately, "Wait!

    Page 91" "...pounding in his temples..."

    The character-string "ounce" is found a handful of times thoughout the text of ATT.
    As does the word "stone".

    1 stone = 14 pounds (not troy pounds, but avoirdupois)

    Additionally, within ATT we find grains of wood, grains of salt, flour granules.

    And quoting an online source:
    "GRAIN One of the earliest units of weight for gold; one grain being the equivalent of one grain of wheat taken from the middle of the ear. 1 grain = 0.0648 grams or 0.002083 troy ounces. 15.43 grains = 1 gram; 480.6 grains = 1 troy ounce; 24 grains = 1 pennyweight. See also Granules.

    GRANULES Bullion, including its various alloys presented for sale in granulated form, often referred to as grain.


    Quoting here from another online source"
    Grain:
    An ancient unit which was originally based on the weight of a grain of wheat. The grain is the smallest unit of weight in the avoirdupois, troy, and apothecaries systems. Surprisingly it is identical in all three systems."

    Wheat and ear references in ATT? Certainly the word "ear".
    The word "wheat"? May have to reach for that one:
    "dearie" or "sweetie"—

    Page 27: "Then we eat him," thought Spider.

    Page 51: "Now we eat him," whispered Spider.


    On a hunch, I looked up the Author's mailing address. Though this would seem beyond the scope of finding clues "within the book", it was a bit satisfying. Give it a go, (may want to try www.infospace.com) and let me know what you think of the pound and stone.

    Just for fun, to anagram "Troy Ounces" results in one of many possibilities: "no cue story".

    The simple word "ounce" can anagram to "no cue".

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I've also read some questions/ideas on this and other boards about Lincoln. Have you read anything into that (Lincoln), or a penny (possibly leading to pennyweight)?
    The word "center" appears several times in ATT.
    Again, this is reaching, but the reverse of an older Lincoln penny (one cent, or is that scent):

    Those are "ears of wheat" on either side.

  6. #16
    glotowner is offline Junior Twelever Copper glotowner is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    39

    Default

    The simple word "ounce" also anagrams to "one u c", as opposed to the one we don't.

  7. #17
    whisper is offline Twelever Silver whisper is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    307

    Default

    and then there's the wheat penny...

  8. #18
    quakrspecl's Avatar
    quakrspecl is offline Twelever Silver quakrspecl is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Down SR77 from Lyndale Q
    Posts
    311

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by glotowner
    The simple word "ounce" also anagrams to "one u c", as opposed to the one we don't.
    Why, yes it does. I like that.

  9. #19
    benzleasr's Avatar
    benzleasr is offline Good Twelever TwelevePlus
    Aquamarine
    benzleasr is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    895

    Default Mass

    Quakrspecal, concerning "mass", if I remember correctly, the Darklings were referred to many times as the dark mass, which leads to Einstein's theories. Many references to alchemists. Einstein, Newton..etc.

  10. #20
    gribbin6 is offline Needs to say Hello! gribbin6 is an unknown quantity at this point
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    alaska
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I have been working on my treasure hunt for some time now and would like to add my clues as seen fit. Fortnight is a period of 14 days, but the old english way to spell it is FEOWERTINE NIHT. This is how "I new of thirteen". I'm close with the state and place, I just haven't figured out the exact location yet. Gina in Alaska

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts