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Thread: General discussion

  1. #71
    lafitte's Avatar
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    I ordered a copy yesterday . I'm bothered by a couple of parts of this verse. Sounds from the sky, near ace is high. Airport? (Funny how Ace Took Heights always seemed like a red herring.) Giant pole, giant step has me sratching my head. I've been trying to catch up on the Q4T site. Lots to read...
    If it is in the square we would have to get permission to dig. They won't even let us put our feet in the fountain! I'll work on this some more and see if any of the other verses work better.Lafitte

  2. #72
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    there's no way it's IN jackson square!

    wilhouse

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by lafitte
    I ordered a copy yesterday . I'm bothered by a couple of parts of this verse. Sounds from the sky, near ace is high. Airport? (Funny how Ace Took Heights always seemed like a red herring.)  Giant pole, giant step has me sratching my head. I've been trying to catch up on the Q4T site. Lots to read...
    If it is in the square we would have to get permission to dig. They won't even let us put our feet in the fountain! I'll work on this some more and see if any of the other verses work better.Lafitte
    Can you give some history on the "Liberty Monument"
    and its original locaiton (at the foot of canal street)

    Has this spot been overhalled (since 1982) with the
    Aquarium and the Insectarium??

  4. #74
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    Here is an article about the Liberty Monument. Perhaps we should move this thread to verse #7 page? Lafitte


    The Liberty Monument
    In New Orleans stands what for most persons is an obscure monument to an obscure incident. The Liberty Monument celebrates the 1874 Battle of Liberty Place, described by an admiring local historian as "The Overthrow of Carpet-Bag Rule in New Orleans -- September 14, 1874." Members of the appropriately named White League engaged in the violent overthrow of the existing Louisiana government, composed of an alliance of Republican whites and newly enfranchised African-Americans. Thirty-two lives were lost on both sides, with about three times that many persons injured. The ousted administration of Republican Governor Kellogg was in fact reinstated by force of federal arms, but it was only a matter of time until the Compromise of 1877 resulted in full-scale restoration of conservative white rule as sought by the White League, with attendant consequences for the future of African-Americans.
    Immediately following the battle, with the partisans of the White League in apparent control of the state (of which New Orleans was then the capital), the New Orleans Daily Picayune saluted the downfall of the Kellogg regime (which, in the words of the editors, had "collapsed at one touch of honest indignation and gallant onslaught") and called for the erection of a memorial to the eleven whites who had died in behalf of the insurgency. The New Orleans City Council formally agreed in November 1882, when it passed an ordinance renaming the area of the battle as "Liberty Place" and authorizing the erection of a monument "in honor of those who fell in defense of liberty and home rule in that heroic struggle of the 14th of September, 1874." By 1891 these hopes were realized with the construction of an obelisk near the Mississippi River at the foot of Canal Street, a principal street in the city. (New Orleans had seven years earlier erected a giant monument to Robert E. Lee that continues to preside, entirely unobscurely, over Lee Circle.) The Liberty Monument included the names of those White Leaguers who gave their lives in attacking the hated mixed-race government, as well as the names of some of the League leaders. According to Judith Kelleher Schafer, a leading historian of the incident, the 1891 dedication of the monument initiated what became a yearly parade thereafter each September 14, with suitable wreath-laying ceremonies to honor the civic heroes.
    Lest anyone unaccountably fail to get the intended message, the city, using artisans supplied by the federally funded Works Progress Administration, added in 1934 two plaques setting out the official version of events. On one side of the base was chiseled, "United States troopers took over the state government and reinstated the usurpers but the national election in November 1876 recognized white supremacy and gave us our state." On the opposite side appeared, "McEnery and Penn, having been elected governor and lieutenant governor by the white people, were duly installed by the overthrow of the carpetbag government, ousting the usurpers Gov. Kellogg (white) and Lt. Gov. Antoine (colored)."
    As one might well expect, the Liberty Monument has remained a source of controversy in New Orleans, especially as African-Americans have become a dominant political force in the city. In 1974, for example, Mayor Moon Landrieu agreed to the placement near the monument of a brass plaque describing the battle as an "insurrection" and noting that the controversial language carved on its base had not in fact been part of the original 1891 monument. Most important, no doubt, was the plaque's additional message that "the sentiments expressed are contrary to the philosophy and beliefs of present-day New Orleans," a statement itself raising delicious political and philosophical questions. Is New Orleans an entity that can have a "philosophy and beliefs," and, if so, how precisely does one identify what they are, or who is authorized to speak performatively as to their content? One wonders also if it is possible that the statement, whatever its accuracy at the time of installation, was chiefly designed to create the consciousness that it purports to describe. In any event, there is no doubt that New Orleans adopted an overtly tutelary role in attempting to limit somewhat the pernicious consequences of the Liberty Monument, lest the citizens be tempted to treat the words chiseled upon it as an authoritative enunciation of the meaning of the event that was, after all, being commemorated.
    When Ernest Morial became the first black mayor of the city in 1981, he attempted to remove the monument, but was stopped from doing so by the majority white City Council, which forbade the moving of any monuments without its consent. (Does the Council therefore merit an award for fending off the forces of censorship?) The Council did, however, authorize the removal of any offensive wording on the monument (so maybe it doesn't deserve an award after all). Smooth granite slabs were then placed over the 1934 additions, presumably obviating the need for the plaque's renunciatory sentiments.
    During the late 1980s the administration of a second black mayor, Sidney Barthelemy, tried to remove the monument permanently from view during the course of general riverfront reconstruction, when it had been taken down from its Canal Street location. However, an interesting alliance of traditionalists, historical preservationists, and white supremacists successfully blocked the effort. Nevertheless, the monument was ultimately moved from its original spot to a decidedly more obscure setting about a block away, where it now languishes out of the sight of most of the tourists who crowd Canal Street and its fine shops, casinos, municipal aquarium, and vistas of the Mississippi. It remains in the area at all only because of a consent agreement between the City and the State Historic Preservation Officer, based on federal historic preservation laws, that the monument remain in the general vicinity of the battle.
    Once again, though, the "official" story changed, for now there was yet another large plaque placed on the monument itself: "In honor of those Americans on both sides of the conflict who died in the Battle of Liberty Place. A conflict of the past that should teach us lessons for the future." What these lessons are is left wholly unarticulated. The voice of the tutor is quite muffled, leaving the monument to "speak for itself." We may reasonably wonder if this really represents progress over the 1974 point-and-counterpoint between the chiseled words on the base of the monument and the revisionist plaque, an exchange that at least educated the careful reader as to the ideological stakes behind the ascription of meaning to the Liberty Monument.

  5. #75
    cormac is offline Needs to say Hello! cormac is an unknown quantity at this point
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    What you got so far?
    I may be able to help.

  6. #76
    cw0909 is offline Good Twelever Platinum cw0909 is an unknown quantity at this point
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    i know this is an old thread, i ran across a pic of
    a casque in the plexi

    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VUuUpG2em...34.51%2BPM.png

    source
    Legacy of the Secret Keys: Further Research

  7. #77
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    Clay is very difficult to dig into...
    ========================

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