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    It is the birthday of Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880) (books by this author). Born in 1802 in Medford, Massachusetts, to an abolitionist family, she published her first book at the age of 22. Hobomok, A Tale of Early Times was a historical novel. In it, Child wrote about Hobomok, a young Indian man in colonial New England, who steps in to marry and care for Mary Conant, a white woman, when she is devastated by the deaths of her mother and her white lover. Hobomok and Mary have a son and, as the book says, she grows to love him. But when her white lover, not having died after all, returns after several years, Mary leaves Hobomok and, taking the child, marries the white man. He adopts the child, and he and Mary educate the boy at Cambridge. Hobomok, his heart broken by the loss of his wife and child, "murmured his farewell and blessing, and forever passed away from New England," symbolically leaving the land to its new white inhabitants. Writing of Mary and Hobomok, Child said [beginning of Chapter 19]:
    Desolate as Mary's lot might seem, it was not without its alleviations. All the kind attentions which could suggest themselves to the mind of a savage, were paid by her Indian mother. Hobomok continued the same tender reverence he had always evinced, and he soon understood the changing expression of her countenance, till her very looks were a law. So much love could not but awaken gratitude; and Mary by degrees gave way to its influence, until she welcomed his return with something like affection. True, in her solitary hours there were reflections enough to make her wretched. Kind as Hobomok was, and rich as she found his uncultivated mind in native imagination, still the contrast between him and her departed lover would often be remembered with sufficient bitterness. Besides this, she knew that her own nation looked upon her as lost and degraded; and, what was far worse, her own heart echoed back the charge. Hobomok's connection with her was considered the effect of witchcraft on his part, and even he was generally avoided by his former friends. However, this evil brought its own cure. Every wound of this kind, every insult which her husband courageously endured for her sake, added romantic fervor to her increasing affection, and thus made life something more than endurable.
    Her book of poems, Flowers for Children (1844-1846), included "A New England Boy's Song about Thanksgiving Day," which begins with the well-known lines: "Over the river and through the wood / To grandfather's house we go; / The horse knows the way / To carry the sleigh / Through the white and drifted snow." In her eulogy, abolitionist Wendell Phillips said of Child that she was "ready to die for a principle and starve for an ideal." Commenting on her work, the leading literary periodical of the time — the North American Review — said, "Few female writers, if any, have done more or better things for our literature."

    ~


    On this day in 1944, writer Joy Williams (1944 - ) (books by this author) was born in Chelmsford, Massachusetts. The author of four novels, her first book, State of Grace (1973), was nominated for a National Book Award for Fiction, and her most recent book, The Quick and the Dead (2000), was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize. Her second book was not as well received as State of Grace, prompting her to say the reviews "were such that you felt they wanted you to die — or if you refused to die, then you could at least stop writing." And she did stop writing novels for a time, focusing on short stories, which she calls her favorite literary form.

    ~


    Screenwriter Philip Dunne (1908-1992) was born in New York City on this day in 1908. Politically active, he helped organize the Writers Guild of America and fought against entertainment industry blacklists of writers suspected of leftist leanings in the 1940s and 1950s. Although not blacklisted himself, along with Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall and others, he protested these actions before the House [of Representatives] Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) in 1947. Among Dunne's many screenwriting credits are How Green Was My Valley (1941) and The Robe (1953). In How Green Was My Valley, the main character, Huw, remembering his childhood in Wales, said, "For if my father was the head of our house, my mother was its heart." In addition to his screenplays, Dunne contributed articles to The New Yorker and Atlantic Monthly.

    ~


    And it is the birthday of Joseph L. Mankiewicz (1909-1993), film director, producer, and screenwriter, who was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, in 1909. He won many awards, including double Oscars as Best Director and Best Screenplay for A Letter to Three Wives (1949) and All About Eve (1950). In All About Eve, Bette Davis as Margo Channing enthralled audiences with the line, "Fasten your seatbelts. It's going to be a bumpy night."

    ~

    It is the feast day today of Caedmon (died 680 A.D.), a cowherd and monk at Whitby Abbey in England. He is the author of Caedmon's Hymn, one of the earliest examples of a poem written in English. According to accounts from the time, his ability to compose poetry came to him in a dream. Popularly remembered as a saint, Caedmon wrote religious poems in Old English (450-1100 A.D.), the language of Beowulf, which was a precursor of Middle English (1100-1500 A.D.), the language of Chaucer. Caedmon's Hymn, his only surviving work, begins, "Praise we the Lord / of the Heavenly Kingdom / God's Power and Wisdom / the Works of His Hand." (C.W. Kennedy translation from Old English)
    ***********************
    We must be willing to get rid of the life we’ve planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
    ~Joseph Campbell

    There are three kinds of people : Those who can count and those that can't.




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    It was on this day in 1974 that author Alexander Solzhenitsyn (books by this author) was exiled from the Soviet Union. He was convicted of treason on the 12th, sent out of the country the very next day, and it would be 20 years before he ever set foot in Russia again.
    Starting in the early 1960s, Solzhenitsyn had made himself an enemy of the state by clandestinely publishing novels based on his experiences in Stalin's forced labor camps. He would write a novel in secret and then his friends would smuggle the manuscript out of the country to be published abroad. He built a huge following in the West and won a Nobel Prize in literature in 1970, but he was always on the verge of being caught.
    In December of 1973, the KGB discovered a draft of The Gulag Archipelago, Solzhenitsyn's seminal work; the first book to document the camps' existence and to capture the full scope and horror of what happened there. Writing this book was the crime that got him exiled. He moved with his family to a little farm in Vermont and continued to write, working seven days a week, almost the entire day. He felt a responsibility to tell stories, not just for his craft, but for the people whose lives and deaths had inspired him. In his 1980 book The Oak and the Calf: Sketches of Literary Life in the Soviet Union, he writes, "They are dead. You are alive. Do your duty. The world must know all about it!"

    ~


    It's the birthday of William Roughead, (books by this author) considered one of the greatest true-crime writers. Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1870, Roughead was a lawyer who developed a fascination with murder trials early in his career. In 1889, while still a teenager, he played hooky from his apprenticeship to attend the trial of murderess Jessie King, the last woman ever hanged in Edinburgh. From that year until 1949, Roughead could be seen in the audience of every major murder trial held in the Edinburgh High Court.
    He began writing about these trials for legal journals, but his frank, pulpy prose lent itself to popular reading and in 1913 he published his first anthology of crime stories, Twelve Scots Trials. He hated the title. In the preface to his 1922 book, Glengarry's Way and Other Studies, he wrote, "Of those three fateful words two at least were unhappily chosen. 'Scots' tended to arouse hereditary prejudice. ... 'Trials' suggested to the lay mind either the bloomless technicalities of law reports or the raw and ribald obscenities of the baser press. Had they been a 'baker's dozen' the game would have been up indeed."
    Roughead published more than 13 anthologies of crime, his writing influencing the likes of Henry James and Joyce Carol Oates. In an article for The New York Review of Books, Oates wrote, "Roughead's influence was enormous. ... He wrote in a style that combined intelligence, witty skepticism, and a flair for old-fashioned storytelling and moralizing; his accounts of murder cases and trials have the advantage of being concise and pointed, like folk tales."

    ~


    It's also the birthday of cartoonist Sidney Smith, born Robert Sidney Smith in 1877 in Bloomington, Illinois. He began drawing for the Bloomington paper at the age of 18, and by 1917 he was on the staff of the Chicago Tribune. That year, he took up an editor's challenge to create a comic strip about utterly average Americans. The result was "The Gumps," the first newspaper comic to use a continuing, soap opera-style storyline, influencing successors from "Gasoline Alley" to "For Better or For Worse."
    It was fantastically successful. "The Gumps" became the first comic strip to kill off a main character in 1929 and the first to make the move to radio in 1934.

    ~


    The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers was founded today in New York City in 1914. The founding membership included some of the most popular musicians of the day, including Irving Berlin, John Philip Sousa, and the composer Victor Herbert. The group was formed to protect intellectual property and help musically inclined writers make a living off their art. Technically, there were already laws on the books that should have done this, but many of them weren't being enforced.
    According to ASCAP lore, it was Victor Herbert who realized what a problem enforcement had become when he walked into a hotel one evening and heard one of his own songs being played. Knowing he hadn't given permission or been paid for his music, Herbert set out to create a union that would stand up for the rights of musicians and composers.
    The first office of the ASCAP was little more than a closet in New York's Fulton Theater Building. The office furniture consisted of a table and a single, broken chair. Today, the organization has more than 300,000 members, and it collects and distributes millions in royalties.
    ***********************
    We must be willing to get rid of the life we’ve planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
    ~Joseph Campbell

    There are three kinds of people : Those who can count and those that can't.




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    It is the birthday of comic book artist and graphic novelist Art Spiegelman, (books by this author) born in 1948 in Stockholm, Sweden. Spiegelman is best known for his graphic novel Maus: A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds History and its follow-up, Maus: A Survivor's Tale II: and Here My Troubles Began. These books tell the story of Spiegelman's parents, who were Holocaust survivors. The books are considered to be the crowning achievement of the graphic novel genre — Maus II even won a special Pulitzer Prize in 1992. Critics praise the books for both their unique approach to the Holocaust and their radical treatment of the comic book form. Other artists have followed in Spiegelman's footsteps, and the graphic novel genre is now accepted as a valid literary form. In an interview with Booksense.com, Spiegelman was asked what it is about comics that satisfies him. He replied, "Comics are a narrative art form, a form that combines two other forms of expression: words and pictures ... in the hands of someone who knows their medium, great things can happen. Good comics make an impression that lasts forever."
    ***********************
    We must be willing to get rid of the life we’ve planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
    ~Joseph Campbell

    There are three kinds of people : Those who can count and those that can't.




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    Henry Brooks Adams was born this day in 1838 in Boston. Although he came from a long line of successful politicians — most notably his great-grandfather John Adams and grandfather John Quincy Adams — Henry Adams preferred to be an observer of political events. In his memoir, The Education of Henry Adams, the writer spoke about himself as a man who, "never got to the point of playing the game ... he lost himself in the study of it, watching the errors of the players."
    Henry Adams attended Harvard, became a journalist, and returned to his alma mater to teach medieval history in 1870. He wrote an epic nine-volume History of the United States During the Administrations of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison (1891), and distinguished himself as one of America's first memoirists with The Education of Henry Adams (191.
    Henry Adams is best known for his memoir, which was originally meant only for family and friends. Although Adams once remarked, "The proper study of mankind is woman," The Education of Henry Adams is completely void of any mention of his wife.
    Adams married Marian Hooper in 1872 — the two traveled together, and Marian often helped her husband with his research. She was the model for the heroine in his satire Democracy (1880).
    Marian was deeply affected by the death of her father in 1885. She took her own life shortly afterward, and Adams was shattered. In a letter to his friend E.L. Godkin that year, Adams wrote, "I admit that fate at last has smashed the life out of me; but for twelve years I had everything I most wanted on earth."

    ~


    Today is the birthday of historian G.M. Trevelyan, born George Macaulay Trevelyan in 1876 near Stratford, England. Unlike Henry Adams, Trevelyan belonged to a school of historians who believed that history should be a literary as opposed to scientific art. He wrote, "The art of history remains always the art of narrative. That is the bedrock." Trevelyan is most famous for his books England Under the Stuarts (1907), British History in the Nineteenth Century (1922), and History of England (1926).


    ~


    It's the birthday of novelist Richard Ford, (books by this author) born in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1944. His trilogy of novels starring Frank Bascombe has won him popular and critical acclaim. The Sportswriter (1986), Independence Day (1995), and The Lay of the Land (2006) have all won various awards; Independence Day won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1996.
    Although many of his stories are set in the South, Ford has resisted critics' efforts to label him as a "Southern" writer. In an interview with Harper's he said, "Categorization (women's writing, +++++++++++++++ writing, Illinois writing) inflicts upon art exactly what art strives at its best never to inflict on itself: arbitrary and irrelevant limits, shelter from the widest consideration and judgment, [and] exclusion from general excellence."
    Ford has overcome a number of labels and difficulties in his life. His father died of a heart attack when he was 16. He was dyslexic as a child but majored in English at Michigan State University. He attempted to pursue a number of alternate career paths, even spending some time in law school, but Ford always came back to writing. Beginning in 1981, he wrote articles for Inside Sports magazine. When the publication went under, Ford accepted his wife Kristina's challenge to "write a book about a happy man." The Sportswriter was named one of the five best books of 1986 by Time magazine and went on to earn the PEN/Faulkner citation for fiction in 1987.
    ***********************
    We must be willing to get rid of the life we’ve planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
    ~Joseph Campbell

    There are three kinds of people : Those who can count and those that can't.




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    It's the birthday of novelist and rabbi Chaim Potok, (books by this author) born in New York City in 1929, who is best known for his seminal work The Chosen (1967). Other well-known novels include The Promise (1969), My Name is Asher Lev (1972), and The Book of Lights (1981); like Potok himself, the protagonists of these works are all Orthodox Jews raised in New York City. As a teenager, Potok read Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, followed by James Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. The power of these two novels combined convinced Potok to become a writer himself — as he explained in an interview, he was amazed by "the realization that you could really create the world out of language." Potok graduated with honors from Yeshiva University, a private Jewish college, in 1950; in 1954 he was ordained as a rabbi from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. The following year he left New York for South Korea, where he served for two years as an Army chaplain. When he returned to the United States, he wrote a novel about Korea, but it was rejected. A few years later, Potok moved to Jerusalem to work on his doctorate. It was there that he wrote The Chosen, which would become his first published novel.

    ~



    It's the birthday of the lyricist poet Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer,(books by this author) born Gustavo Adolfo Domínguez Bastida in Seville, Spain, in 1836. Bécquer's aptly named Rhymes (1871) and Legends (1857-64) — his most famous works of poetry and prose, respectively — are frequently published together as Rimas y leyendas. Rhymes and Legends is considered required reading in Spanish-speaking countries around the world. Like the Romantics, Bécquer's poetry invokes melancholy, introspective themes of love and loss; but his departure from the confined rhetorical structure of Spanish literature and his use of colloquial language have earned him the status of Spain's first Modern poet. After a failed position in the civil service, Bécquer made ends meet as a journalist and translator in Madrid, where he joined an active group of Bohemian artists and intellectuals. His now-canonical poetry, along with most of his writing, was published by his friends after he died a pauper at the age of 34. Bécquer's unrequited love for Julia, the daughter of one of his mentors, is believed to have fueled many of the Rimas, as in "Rhyme 85":
    So that you read them with your grey eyes,
    so that you sing them with your clear voice,
    so that they fill your chest with emotion
    I made my verses.
    (Translation by H. Landman)
    ~
    It's the birthday of Andrew Barton Paterson (Narrambla, New South Wales, 1864), (books by this author) the Australian poet, journalist, and songwriter known as "Barty" to his family and friends and "Banjo" to his readers. "The Banjo" was Paterson's pseudonym of choice for his early poems (he named himself after a racehorse rather than an affinity with the musical instrument). While The Banjo published poetry, Andrew Paterson became a partner in a law firm by age 22. Paterson is best known for writing the lyrics to "Waltzing Matlida," a wildly popular ballad heralded as Australia's national song and covered or adapted by countless musicians, from Tom Waits to Harry Belafonte to a Jamaican ska group called The Silvertones. In 1895 — the same year he wrote "Waltzing Matilda" — Paterson published his first book of poems, The Man from Snowy River and Other Verses, which sold out its first edition in one week and went through four editions in its first six months. For a time, Banjo Patterson was the second-most popular poet writing in English in the world, after Rudyard Kipling. His other books of poetry are Rio Grande's Last Race and Other Verses (1904) and The Animals Noah Forgot (1933). In The Man from Snowy River's final poem, "Daylight Is Dying," Patterson leaves his readers with the hope that
    These tales, roughly wrought of
    The bush and its ways,
    May call back a thought of
    The wandering days,
    And, blending with each
    In the memories that throng,
    There haply shall reach
    You some echo of song.
    ~
    It's the birthday of crime novelist Ruth Rendell,(books by this author) born in 1930 in London, England, who also writes under the name Barbara Vine. She is a best-selling writer — dubbed the Queen of Crime — and author of more than 50 books. Her first novel, From Doon with Death (1964), began her popular Wexford series, named for its celebrated main character, Chief Inspector Reginald Wexford. She has since written 20 more Wexford novels, including the recent Not in the Flesh (2007).

    ~


    Joining the Queen of Crime in birthdays today is the Grand Dame of Science Fiction and Fantasy, Andre Norton (born Alice Mary Norton in 1912 in Cleveland, Ohio) (books by this author). Norton adopted the pseudonym Andre in 1934 in an attempt to market her work in a male-dominated genre; 40 years later, Norton was the first woman to receive the Grand Master Award from the World Science Fiction Society. Norton wrote more than 130 novels in her 70 years as a writer, as well as nearly a hundred short stories. A month before her death in March 2005 at age 93, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America created the Andre Norton Award for an outstanding work of science fiction or fantasy for young adults. Witch World (1963) is the first in more than 30 titles in Norton's popular series by the same name. "As for courage and will," wrote Norton, "we cannot measure how much of each lies within us, we can only trust there will be sufficient to carry through trials which may lie ahead."
    ***********************
    We must be willing to get rid of the life we’ve planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
    ~Joseph Campbell

    There are three kinds of people : Those who can count and those that can't.




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    It's the birthday of American novelist and essayist Toni Morrison, (books by this author) born Chloe Anthony Wofford in Lorain, Ohio (1931). Morrison's first big success was the 1977 novel Song of Solomon, about a rich black businessman who tries to hide his working-class background. She is perhaps known best for her intricate and moving novel Beloved, which was published in 1987 and later made into a film starring Oprah Winfrey. Morrison is the winner of a Nobel Prize in literature, and her new book, Mercy, is scheduled to be released later this year.

    ~

    It is the birthday of writer and editor Helen Gurley Brown, (books by this author) born Helen Gurley in Green Forest, Arkansas (1922). Her first book, Sex and the Single Girl, was published in 1962. The book served as a kind of manual for the newly emergent young, career-oriented, financially independent single woman. It was due partially to the success of Sex and the Single Girl that Brown was appointed editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan magazine in 1965. She remained in that position until her retirement in 1996 at the age of 73. Brown went on to publish several other books, including Outrageous Opinions (1966), Sex and the New Single Girl (1970), Having It All (1982) and, more recently, Dear ++++++++cat (LOL! I'll just insert kitty in here for now geesh! ): Mash Notes and Missives from the Desk of Cosmopolitan's Legendary Editor (2004). Brown continues to live and work in New York City.
    ***********************
    We must be willing to get rid of the life we’ve planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
    ~Joseph Campbell

    There are three kinds of people : Those who can count and those that can't.




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    It's the birthday of author Amy Tan, (books by this author) born in 1952, in Oakland, California. Tan is best known for her first novel, The Joy Luck Club. A first-generation daughter of Chinese immigrant parents, Tan spent much of her youth trying to deny her heritage. From third grade on, she was the only Chinese-American girl in her class. Tan once went a week sleeping with a close pin on her nose, trying to make it narrower and more like her classmates' noses. She was embarrassed by her mother's broken English and by her Chinese customs.
    When Tan was 15, her father and older brother both died of brain tumors, within six months of each other. Her mother became convinced spirits were cursing the family, and she moved Tan and her younger brother to Switzerland. Tan continued to rebel against her mother, who wanted her to become a part-time concert pianist and a full-time brain surgeon. Instead, Tan became an English and linguistics major, and fell in love with an Italian. She and her mother didn't speak for six months.
    Tan worked as a freelance business writer, working 90-hour weeks to keep up with demand. But she eventually realized she was addicted to work she didn't like. She went into counseling and began writing short stories.
    When her mother went into the hospital in 1985, Tan promised herself that if her mother survived, she would take her to China and learn her mother's stories. It was a trip that would change Tan's perspective. She said later, "When my feet touched China, I became Chinese."
    Tan's short stories became The Joy Luck Club (1989), a novel about four Chinese immigrant mothers and their relationships with their American-born daughters. It was an instant best seller and was made into a film. Tan has written five novels, all best sellers, including The Kitchen God's Wife (1991) and The Bonesetter's Daughter (2001). Her most recent novel is Saving Fish from Drowning (2005).
    ***********************
    We must be willing to get rid of the life we’ve planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
    ~Joseph Campbell

    There are three kinds of people : Those who can count and those that can't.




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    It's the birthday of photographer Ansel Adams, born in San Francisco (1902) and best known for his black-and-white Western landscapes, many of them shot in national parks. His nose was broken in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and never was set properly. It jutted to the left. As a boy he loved to hike around Golden Gate Park and along Lobos Creek, or out to Baker Beach - a boy who didn't care so much for school, who wanted to become a concert pianist. But when he was 14, his parents gave him a Kodak Brownie camera, and that same summer he saw Yosemite for the first time. He went back every year from then until he died at 81. He joined the Sierra Club when he was 17 and became their photographer, publishing his first pictures in the 1922 Sierra Club Bulletin. He supported himself with commercial photography, but he's remembered for his images of the Sierras and Yosemite. Ansel Adams said, "A good photograph is knowing where to stand."
    ***********************
    We must be willing to get rid of the life we’ve planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
    ~Joseph Campbell

    There are three kinds of people : Those who can count and those that can't.




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    It's the birthday of W.H. Auden, (books by this author) born in York, England (1907), the son of a physician and a nurse. He went to Christ Church, Oxford on a biology scholarship. He switched to English literature, met young poets who became his lifelong friends, and he glided into a literary career. Just before the start of World War II, he immigrated to the United States to teach English. Auden once said, "A professor is someone who talks in someone else's sleep." He was a New Yorker for much of his life, a kindly man with a wrinkled face. He said, "My face looks like a wedding-cake left out in the rain."


    He published more than 400 poems, essays, plays, and opera librettos. "No opera plot can be sensible, for people do not sing when they are feeling sensible," he said. His poem "Funeral Blues" begins:
    Stop all of the clocks, cut off the telephone,
    Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
    Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
    Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.
    Auden once said, "Words so excite me that a pornographic story, for example, excites me sexually more than a living person can do." He said, "A poet is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with language."

    ~



    It's the birthday of novelist and short-story writer David Foster Wallace, (books by this author) born in Ithaca, New York (1962). The son of a philosophy professor and an English professor, Wallace double-majored in these subjects and described himself as "obscenely educated."
    He is best known for his 1,079-page Infinite Jest, an ambitious, sprawling novel published in 1996. In this novel's future world, the U.S. is part of one unified state that includes Mexico and Canada, and New England has become a vast hazardous waste dump. The book, which frequently includes lengthy footnotes and invented vocabulary, juxtaposes the struggles of outpatients in a drug and alcohol treatment house against life in a posh tennis academy. In it years are referred to not by numers but by the name of their corporate sponsor: the Year of the Whisper-Quiet Maytag Dishmaster, the Year of the Depend Adult Undergarment, the Year of Dairy Products from the American Heartland.
    Wallace said, "Fiction's about what it is to be a human being."

    ~


    It's the birthday of Anaïs Nin, (books by this author) born in Neuilly, France (1903), the daughter of a Spanish composer and Danish-Cuban classically trained singer. She is best known for her diaries, which she began writing at age 11 and continued for more than 60 years - and which include accounts of her passionate love affair with Henry Miller in Paris. Anaïs Nin said, "We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospection."

    ~


    It's the birthday of poet and novelist Ha Jin, (books by this author) born in Liaoning Province, China (1956). When he was 10 years old, he witnessed the arrival of the Cultural Revolution, and at 14 he joined the People's Liberation Army, after which he began to educate himself by studying the classics of Chinese literature. He learned English by listening to the radio and studied English in college, then came to the U.S. for graduate school. He intended to go back to China, but after watching on TV the massacre at Tiananmen Square, he decided that "it would be impossible to write honestly in China," and so he decided to stay in the United States. He supported himself as a busboy at a Chinese restaurant, and then his novel Waiting won the National Book Award for fiction in 1999. His most recent novel is A Free Life (2007).
    ***********************
    We must be willing to get rid of the life we’ve planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us.
    ~Joseph Campbell

    There are three kinds of people : Those who can count and those that can't.




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    Man, Nin and Auden on the same day! Talk about beautiful eclipses!

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