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Thread: A whole new box idea

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    luddite001's Avatar
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    Default A whole new box idea

    Hey! My first post. Got the book two days ago and it's driving me crazy.

    Nowhere in the text or picture clues does it say that the box is a 5 x 5 square. "Before him lay an open box that was as long as it was wide and inside the box were smaller boxes arranged in rows, five to a side."

    Note that it says that the box is OPEN which could mean that, when closed, it is half as long as it is wide. Also, the "five to a side" might not be referring to the rows but to the smaller boxes, i.e., five boxes to a side.

    With that in mind, I came up with the following possible layout:



    Note that the boxes are "arranged in rows" and that there are 5 on the left and 5 on the right. There are a few other ways in which 10 boxes could be arranged in rows within a 3 x 6 grid.

    Any thoughts?

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    Or, supposing that the box is, in fact square. Within this 6 x 6 grid, we have the smaller boxes "arranged in rows, five to a side." In this case, a "side" refers to a side of the box. A 6 x 6 grid contains 36 smaller boxes which would be just enough to hold the 26 letters of the alphabet plus the digits 0 through 9.


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    Or what if the solution has nothing at all to do with boxes? The riddle refers to a "code of numbers five to a side." What if the "code" the author refers to is not a cipher, after all, but a "moral" code. How's this for a possibility?



    Let's all start anagramming T H E T E N C O M M A N D M E N T S

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    Default Can we add or subtract Pentominoes to discover?

    I like your idea! Can we find a way then to use Pentominoes:

    http://www.ex.ac.uk/cimt/puzzles/pentoes/pentoint.htm

    Could we then "plug in the critters?, such as their order as described by Spider, Dragonfly, and Ladybug?

    Perhaps we could plug in Zac's tools and wood lists?
    Perhaps the Fairies and order of Darklings?

    What do you think of this?
    The only token I found was SQUAT!!!
    http://www.tweleve.org/upload/squat_token.jpg

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    luddite001's Avatar
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    On the topic of moral codes, "an even code with on(e) piece nary" could be referring to the Golden Rule.

    "Do unto others as you would have others do unto you." Can't get more even!

    Now if you interpret "on(e) piece nary" as an instruction to remove one of the words -- rule -- you are left with GOLDEN.

    I just went to http://maps.yahoo.com and typed in GOLDEN and it came up with exactlly 13 results:

    Alaska
    Colorado
    Idaho
    Illinois
    Iowa
    Michigan
    Mississippi
    Missouri
    New Mexico
    Oklahoma
    Oregon
    Texas
    West Virginia

    The author says that 12 of them are in the continental US. And a maximum 12-hour drive from anywhere in the US will get you to one of these states. Maybe the Pook token is hiding out in Alaska.

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    cabunk's Avatar
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    Alaska isn't included, as MS has said they are in the 48 continguous (hope that's the right word) states. Hawaii is excluded also.

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    He says that 12 of them are in the contiguous 48 states. He says nothing about the location of the 13th.

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    Default golden rule

    I don't know whether or not you are completely correct, i'm checking into it, but right or not, i must say, that was a brilliant idea, way to think out of the box luddite001.

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    blkjag01 is offline Junior Twelever Copper blkjag01 is an unknown quantity at this point
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    That is correct...Alaska and Hawaii are not included.

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    Default

    Luddite, when I read your post I was reminded of my days in school.

    I don't think they even teach this any more in English Grammar, but we used to have to DIAGRAM sentences. One of the purposes for diagramming a sentence was to discover what phrase or word modified what MAIN part of the sentence, the Subject, the Verb, or the Object. I learned the difference between adverbs and adjectives this way, for example.

    The comma is key.

    Before him lay an open box that was as long as it was wide and inside the box were smaller boxes arranged in rows, five to a side.
    I think the phrase, "five to a side", actually modifies the verb, "arranged". What is arranged? The boxes. The sentence could read,
    Inside the box were smaller boxes arranged five to a side.
    Before your post, I, too, began to visualize the "open box" with five boxes on one side of the hinge and five boxes on the other side of the hinge. The top of the box was my clue. Zac split the limb of a birch tree to make the top.

    Zac stripped the bark from the edges of the birch limb and split it. The two perfectly matched halves would complete the top of Ana's jewel box.
    So the top could be hollowed out to make a place for the jewels. But there are 12 jewels, not ten.

    By the way, the sentence has pentameter - very poem-like and lyrical.

    Before him lay an open box
    That was as long as it was wide
    And inside the box were smaller boxes
    Arranged in rows, five to a side


    Just thought I'd throw that in. Kind of drives the point home, tho, doesn't it?
    "When you created the book, you also created us."

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